• John Galt

    A mostly good article about a mostly good scene. These are good bands that are both agents and indications of an evolving (i.e. improving) local music industry infrastructure. But that last sentence in the article…that last sentence does not even approach truth. I am not usually one to comment on articles but as a fellow musician in New Orleans I am honestly baffled by the trending prevalence of that opinion. And disheartened.
    Cooperation and solidarity are dandy; most musicians that choose to base their careers here do so largely for the beautiful inextricability of music and community that New Orleanians have cultivated–in spite of, or perhaps because of the fact that the music industry here can feel like it’s modeled after our entanglement of ever-sinking streets. There are reasons we choose not to live in L.A. or Nashville…and we are (rightfully) proud of that. But there is also a reason that every waiter in Nashville can play the guitar like Jimmy Page.
    To say that team spirit is what matters most in (local) music is akin to saying that the most important part of this article is the “like” button at the top of the page. The music, after all, is what matters most to music and New Orleans has always known that. Unless you just want cool t-shirts.

  • Pat

    replace the words “team spirit” with soul, or community, and perhaps you’d be more satisfied with the article. I don’t see how community and soul and spirit are akin to the “like” button at the top of this page–but then again, you made that connection.

  • Pat

    replace the words “team spirit” with soul, or community, and perhaps you’d be more satisfied with the article. I don’t see how community and soul and spirit are akin to the “like” button at the top of this page–but then again, you made that connection.

  • Pat

    –In response to John

  • Pat

    And lastly; your positivity is what appears to be ever-sinking, perhaps because of the streets, or perhaps because you hadn’t been part of a collective like Chinquapin. Let’s celebrate a great, positive, thing rather than denounce it for being out of line with how shitty you’ve perceived the past to be.

  • Matthew Anthony

    John Galt
    You crack me up. What makes this scene so special is that it’s a personal one. If you think people getting together and lending a hand for a greater cause isn’t the most important thing then you missed the boat a long time ago champ. Also, your parallels with the “like” button and the article are hilarious.

  • John Galt

    My apologies, Pat…perhaps, I should have been clearer. I was not denouncing Chinquapin, the local indie scene, or any of the bands this article is about. Actually, I wasn’t denouncing anything. My problem was with the journalism. In this time of rapid change (for the music industry), we need to be careful about what we (as an industry) decide is important. A “like” button is not content, it’s just a way for people to associate themselves with something–as well as with the other people that associate with it. The same goes for cooperation, community, or whatever you want to call it. However fruitful the community may be, that is just narrative. It’s filler for the content. A song is content. A performance is content. This article never mentioned, for example, Tyler’s voice or stage presence. This article talked about fruitfulness and climate instead of the fruit…and I know I’m not the only one that’s hungry.
    In other words, people don’t think that Van Gogh was a good painter because of the fact that he cut off his ear. Nor was he a good painter because he cut off his ear. But, I mean, look at this: http://www.vangoghgallery.com/catalog/Painting/330/Night-Cafe-in-the-Place-Lamartine-in-Arles,-The.html

    Know what I’m saying?

    And lastly, of course I’ve been part of a collective…I live in New Orleans.

  • Pat

    Good response John. And thanks for not upping the ante or even equaling my snarky tone. I also rarely comment on articles like this and I’m glad you clarified what you meant in a nice way!

    Pat

  • Fredric Pousson

    It has come to this: with the age of internet communication, even indie music is a popularity contest over a form of expression. Who can get the “likes” and the “retweets”? Conglomerating a few smaller groups of fans into a larger aggregation doesn’t really mean anything to anyone outside of a particular social circle, especially when it’s just a bunch of college-age sheep who want something unoffensive to chase their PBR with. By these means, any run of the mill band (and even some second-rate ones) can create a following via social media and taste something that is very similar to success, but ultimately it is the product being put forth that determines the true value of the band. The music is what matters most, not the means by which it is exposed to the listening public.