Howlin’ Wolf and Beating That Drum Continually

I read a piece about the music market on the North Shore today, about how tough it is to attract a decent crowd to a music club. There’s just not enough of a market of music lovers on the North Shore to sustain a real music scene. Too bad, but then it’s sort of the nature of the beast. The vast majority of North Shore residents (and other suburbs, for that matter), are more family-oriented. There’s little or no “night time economy.” Let’s just say the New Orleans suburbs are pretty much like the rest of the South.

So it was very ambitious and gutsy for the Howlin’ Wolf to open a second club in Mandeville. Howie Kaplan, the Howlin’ Wolf’s owner, is to be congratulated for taking the bold step of a creating a second club. Kaplan has been dedicated to the New Orleans music scene for a very long time. He owned a club in Metairie, and scooped up the Howlin’ Wolf when its original owner, Jack Groetsch, moved on to other things. Other clubs in New Orleans have been involved in charity fundraising (House of Blues and Tipitina’s are predominant) but the Howlin’ Wolf has been getting more and more active in fundraising events for the city and has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for local charities at the events they’ve hosted. In fact, the club recently turned over a $52,000 check to the New Orleans Musicians Assistance Foundation, the fundraising arm of the New Orleans Musicians Clinic, as a result of the Wolf’s hosting a fundraiser during Jazz Fest. “It’s the most successful fundraiser in the history of the ‘Wolf,” said Kaplan. Congratulations and thanks for supporting a great cause.

Sometimes I think something is wrong with me (okay, all you people who think I’m a bitch, go ahead and jeer, see if I care!). Often it’s hard for me to focus on OffBeat; I have so many ideas for projects that could benefit the city that I wonder why I turned out this way. Why do I care? Why can’t I just mind my own business?

Occasionally, I consider the fact that I’ve been beating this music drum for about 25 years now and wonder what hell I’m doing. I’m impatient that many of the so-called “movers and shakers” in the city don’t operate on the same wavelength that I do and don’t see the potential in creating a music museum, a center where visitors and locals alike can learn something more about the music that makes New Orleans very, very special and unique; a place where a visitor can get educated about where to not only hear and experience all types of music. They can’t seem to understand the potential of a plan to transform New Orleans into a high-profile music mecca that attracts hundreds of thousands of international visitors every year. I was appalled when I recently heard a staff member from a local tourism organization wondering why a band couldn’t play for free for an event for the “exposure.” What?!?

Okay, I have to admit that OffBeat may not be on the reading radar for some of the business executives in the city (it should be, people!). One thing OffBeat has been able to do is to raise the consciousness of other media in New Orleans vis a vis music. CityBusiness is now doing pretty regular pieces on issues that affect the music and entertainment community (thanks, guys!). The Times-Pic has also done so much more music coverage in the last 15 years or so. So have other print pubs, and even local television stations are jumping on board. All well and good.

But what I see for the most part is that music is still not perceived as an economic engine for the city. The film industry is far and away perceived as a more important economic stimulus and job provider. And in a lot of ways, music will never be able to compete with film and telelvision production. This industry brings in a lot of money from outside the city; the job creation is evident.

The influence of music is not so evident and is a lot more subtle in that it permeates out culture; it almost defines the city. Film was a new idea. How do we put music in forefront of the agenda for the movers and shakers?

Jazz Fest isn’t enough, although it’s arguably the most important event in the musical history and saga of the city, and has paved the way for the success of the French Quarter Festival and the Voodoo Experience. All three of these events put music front and center. And guess what: the audience RESPONDS. The city responds.

I’ve been beating the drum for two and a half decades now. How long will it take?

  • Thunderbird

    I hear your beat Jan.
    Your drumming does’nt go unappreciated nor un-noticed. You have not only been a journalist but at the same time an activist for the music and the music and it’s relationship to our state. Music is so plentiful sometimes we take it for granted as we do with all the other aspects such as art, seafood, etc. That pain in your heart that no matter how great your last publication, production, or performance was seems to never rest. It keeps telling you that it’s still not enough. That is compassion and why you were put here to represent the greatest musical and culture driven city on earth.

  • Thunderbird

    I hear your beat Jan.
    Your drumming does’nt go unappreciated nor un-noticed. You have not only been a journalist but at the same time an activist for the music and the music and it’s relationship to our state. Music is so plentiful sometimes we take it for granted as we do with all the other aspects such as art, seafood, etc. That pain in your heart that no matter how great your last publication, production, or performance was seems to never rest. It keeps telling you that it’s still not enough. That is compassion and why you were put here to represent the greatest musical and culture driven city on earth.

  • Thunderbird

    I hear your beat Jan.
    Your drumming does’nt go unappreciated nor un-noticed. You have not only been a journalist but at the same time an activist for the music and the music and it’s relationship to our state. Music is so plentiful sometimes we take it for granted as we do with all the other aspects such as art, seafood, etc. That pain in your heart that no matter how great your last publication, production, or performance was seems to never rest. It keeps telling you that it’s still not enough. That is compassion and why you were put here to represent the greatest musical and culture driven city on earth.

  • Thunderbird

    I hear your beat Jan.
    Your drumming does’nt go unappreciated nor un-noticed. You have not only been a journalist but at the same time an activist for the music and the music and it’s relationship to our state. Music is so plentiful sometimes we take it for granted as we do with all the other aspects such as art, seafood, etc. That pain in your heart that no matter how great your last publication, production, or performance was seems to never rest. It keeps telling you that it’s still not enough. That is compassion and why you were put here to represent the greatest musical and culture driven city on earth.

  • Thunderbird

    I hear your beat Jan.
    Your drumming does’nt go unappreciated nor un-noticed. You have not only been a journalist but at the same time an activist for the music and the music and it’s relationship to our state. Music is so plentiful sometimes we take it for granted as we do with all the other aspects such as art, seafood, etc. That pain in your heart that no matter how great your last publication, production, or performance was seems to never rest. It keeps telling you that it’s still not enough. That is compassion and why you were put here to represent the greatest musical and culture driven city on earth.

  • Keep beating the drum Jan – the reverberations echo far and wide.  Your words and your magazine inspire me, although I’m in NE Georgia.   The whole flow & history of music that was allowed to developed in New Orleans has sent waves out throughout the world for the past century to reshape and redefine all styles of music.  It is much bigger than most people can see or realize – although it’s shocking that the city which gave birth to the sound and spirit of musical freedom (indeed, America’s original sound) doesn’t embrace it’s own legacy.  I am a firm believer that your drum is shared by many, and although the beat originates in New Orleans it continues to effect the entire world. 

  • Keep beating the drum Jan – the reverberations echo far and wide.  Your words and your magazine inspire me, although I’m in NE Georgia.   The whole flow & history of music that was allowed to developed in New Orleans has sent waves out throughout the world for the past century to reshape and redefine all styles of music.  It is much bigger than most people can see or realize – although it’s shocking that the city which gave birth to the sound and spirit of musical freedom (indeed, America’s original sound) doesn’t embrace it’s own legacy.  I am a firm believer that your drum is shared by many, and although the beat originates in New Orleans it continues to effect the entire world. 

  • Keep beating the drum Jan – the reverberations echo far and wide.  Your words and your magazine inspire me, although I’m in NE Georgia.   The whole flow & history of music that was allowed to developed in New Orleans has sent waves out throughout the world for the past century to reshape and redefine all styles of music.  It is much bigger than most people can see or realize – although it’s shocking that the city which gave birth to the sound and spirit of musical freedom (indeed, America’s original sound) doesn’t embrace it’s own legacy.  I am a firm believer that your drum is shared by many, and although the beat originates in New Orleans it continues to effect the entire world. 

  • Keep beating the drum Jan – the reverberations echo far and wide.  Your words and your magazine inspire me, although I’m in NE Georgia.   The whole flow & history of music that was allowed to developed in New Orleans has sent waves out throughout the world for the past century to reshape and redefine all styles of music.  It is much bigger than most people can see or realize – although it’s shocking that the city which gave birth to the sound and spirit of musical freedom (indeed, America’s original sound) doesn’t embrace it’s own legacy.  I am a firm believer that your drum is shared by many, and although the beat originates in New Orleans it continues to effect the entire world. 

  • Keep beating the drum Jan – the reverberations echo far and wide.  Your words and your magazine inspire me, although I’m in NE Georgia.   The whole flow & history of music that was allowed to developed in New Orleans has sent waves out throughout the world for the past century to reshape and redefine all styles of music.  It is much bigger than most people can see or realize – although it’s shocking that the city which gave birth to the sound and spirit of musical freedom (indeed, America’s original sound) doesn’t embrace it’s own legacy.  I am a firm believer that your drum is shared by many, and although the beat originates in New Orleans it continues to effect the entire world. 

  • John Jacobs Tucson AZ

    Jan – I know I speak for all those who love the city and its music and totally agree with your drum beating – we love you for it.  Keep up the good work.  I don’t think causes like this are ever resolved but require a constant fight. If it was easy, it would be done already.  As I have been privileged to tell you in person – your words and your work speak to our minds and our hearts and we are grateful for it.  Those of us who are miles away will publicize your work and the city and its music and support it any way we can.  When we are really lucky and can scrape the resources together, we will come to visit.  And the dream of moving to New Orleans lives within us – encouraged by you and your wonderful magazine.  Thanks for all you do.  How long will it take?  Moving a great but troubled city in the right direction is like steering a leaky oil tanker – slow and messy.  Keep pushing.

  • John Jacobs Tucson AZ

    Jan – I know I speak for all those who love the city and its music and totally agree with your drum beating – we love you for it.  Keep up the good work.  I don’t think causes like this are ever resolved but require a constant fight. If it was easy, it would be done already.  As I have been privileged to tell you in person – your words and your work speak to our minds and our hearts and we are grateful for it.  Those of us who are miles away will publicize your work and the city and its music and support it any way we can.  When we are really lucky and can scrape the resources together, we will come to visit.  And the dream of moving to New Orleans lives within us – encouraged by you and your wonderful magazine.  Thanks for all you do.  How long will it take?  Moving a great but troubled city in the right direction is like steering a leaky oil tanker – slow and messy.  Keep pushing.

  • John Jacobs Tucson AZ

    Jan – I know I speak for all those who love the city and its music and totally agree with your drum beating – we love you for it.  Keep up the good work.  I don’t think causes like this are ever resolved but require a constant fight. If it was easy, it would be done already.  As I have been privileged to tell you in person – your words and your work speak to our minds and our hearts and we are grateful for it.  Those of us who are miles away will publicize your work and the city and its music and support it any way we can.  When we are really lucky and can scrape the resources together, we will come to visit.  And the dream of moving to New Orleans lives within us – encouraged by you and your wonderful magazine.  Thanks for all you do.  How long will it take?  Moving a great but troubled city in the right direction is like steering a leaky oil tanker – slow and messy.  Keep pushing.

  • John Jacobs Tucson AZ

    Jan – I know I speak for all those who love the city and its music and totally agree with your drum beating – we love you for it.  Keep up the good work.  I don’t think causes like this are ever resolved but require a constant fight. If it was easy, it would be done already.  As I have been privileged to tell you in person – your words and your work speak to our minds and our hearts and we are grateful for it.  Those of us who are miles away will publicize your work and the city and its music and support it any way we can.  When we are really lucky and can scrape the resources together, we will come to visit.  And the dream of moving to New Orleans lives within us – encouraged by you and your wonderful magazine.  Thanks for all you do.  How long will it take?  Moving a great but troubled city in the right direction is like steering a leaky oil tanker – slow and messy.  Keep pushing.

  • John Jacobs Tucson AZ

    Jan – I know I speak for all those who love the city and its music and totally agree with your drum beating – we love you for it.  Keep up the good work.  I don’t think causes like this are ever resolved but require a constant fight. If it was easy, it would be done already.  As I have been privileged to tell you in person – your words and your work speak to our minds and our hearts and we are grateful for it.  Those of us who are miles away will publicize your work and the city and its music and support it any way we can.  When we are really lucky and can scrape the resources together, we will come to visit.  And the dream of moving to New Orleans lives within us – encouraged by you and your wonderful magazine.  Thanks for all you do.  How long will it take?  Moving a great but troubled city in the right direction is like steering a leaky oil tanker – slow and messy.  Keep pushing.

  • Dave Melerine

    Keep the beat Jan! 
    Here’s a good article about how Nashville beat the drum so hard, that the city is now investing in it’s musical economy and the musicians.  
    Gives hope for the same here in New Orleans.  

    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=13901804

  • Dave Melerine

    Keep the beat Jan! 
    Here’s a good article about how Nashville beat the drum so hard, that the city is now investing in it’s musical economy and the musicians.  
    Gives hope for the same here in New Orleans.  

    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=13901804

  • Dave Melerine

    Keep the beat Jan! 
    Here’s a good article about how Nashville beat the drum so hard, that the city is now investing in it’s musical economy and the musicians.  
    Gives hope for the same here in New Orleans.  

    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=13901804

  • Dave Melerine

    Keep the beat Jan! 
    Here’s a good article about how Nashville beat the drum so hard, that the city is now investing in it’s musical economy and the musicians.  
    Gives hope for the same here in New Orleans.  

    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=13901804

  • Dave Melerine

    Keep the beat Jan! 
    Here’s a good article about how Nashville beat the drum so hard, that the city is now investing in it’s musical economy and the musicians.  
    Gives hope for the same here in New Orleans.  

    http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=13901804

  • Great column Jan! I’m right there with you.  With our musical legacy, I think if we had a world class musical/cultural museum (think EMP in Seattle) we could really bolster our status as a music history mecca, while cluing locals, new transplants, heck even folks from the North Shore, about the fantastic resources around us!

  • Great column Jan! I’m right there with you.  With our musical legacy, I think if we had a world class musical/cultural museum (think EMP in Seattle) we could really bolster our status as a music history mecca, while cluing locals, new transplants, heck even folks from the North Shore, about the fantastic resources around us!

  • Great column Jan! I’m right there with you.  With our musical legacy, I think if we had a world class musical/cultural museum (think EMP in Seattle) we could really bolster our status as a music history mecca, while cluing locals, new transplants, heck even folks from the North Shore, about the fantastic resources around us!

  • Great column Jan! I’m right there with you.  With our musical legacy, I think if we had a world class musical/cultural museum (think EMP in Seattle) we could really bolster our status as a music history mecca, while cluing locals, new transplants, heck even folks from the North Shore, about the fantastic resources around us!

  • Great column Jan! I’m right there with you.  With our musical legacy, I think if we had a world class musical/cultural museum (think EMP in Seattle) we could really bolster our status as a music history mecca, while cluing locals, new transplants, heck even folks from the North Shore, about the fantastic resources around us!

  • Festngator

    Threadheads respond We listen to ideas We may not be pros but we get Sh!t done

  • Festngator

    Threadheads respond We listen to ideas We may not be pros but we get Sh!t done

  • Festngator

    Threadheads respond We listen to ideas We may not be pros but we get Sh!t done

  • Festngator

    Threadheads respond We listen to ideas We may not be pros but we get Sh!t done

  • Festngator

    Threadheads respond We listen to ideas We may not be pros but we get Sh!t done

  • George C. Green

         The major problem with the music scene in New Orleans is that the “industry” is so fragmented. Practically every musician in Big Easy is a “BAND LEADER” and every vocalist is a SINGER/SONG WRITER! Musicians don’t work together, everybody wants to be “the best”. Musicians can tell you, without hesitation, what’s wrong with every other band/musician. They completely overlook the history of the busines!; Brodway was built on TIN PAN ALLEY; a collection of song writers and publishers; “Rock&roll was bolstered by such enterprises as THE BRILL BUILDING, another collection of writers and publishers. Country music is fueled by the writers and publishers on MUSIC ROW and MUSIC SQUARE; more writers and publishers. Motown was built pushed to its heights by a cadre of song writers; SMOKEY ROBINSON, HOLLAND, DOZIER and HOLLAND, ASHFORD and SIMPSON, TOM BELL and LINDA CREED were the top of the heap. The studio musicians who “made the sessions” and created the music were accomplished Jazz musicians who had the dexteriety and ability to manipulate the music and turn a basic song into a finished product. In the 50s when New Orleans produced its biggest catalouge of music, it was Jazz musicians who manned the studios; ALVIN “RED” TYLER, TEDDY RILEY, ALBERT “JUNE” GARDNER, PETER “CHUCK” BADIE, EDWARD FRANK, EARL PLAMER,CLARENCE FORD, HERBERT HARDESTY; et al. If Jazz isn’t making much money why not play some funk, make some money then go play Jazz for the love of the art? The “Jazz” musicians are so full of themselves they think they can satisfy and audience with “how good they play” their instruments. Jazz has a shrinking market and you can not get no blood from no turnip; if it aint there, it aint there!
         New Orleans is in the “MUSIC business” but all efforts are geared to launching into the “RECORD  business”. The record business is about selling personalities while the music business is about selling music/songs; big ol’ difference! You don’t need talent to “make it” in the record business, just noteriety; good or bad! 
         Don’t say I shouldn’t say that; tell me where I’m wrong.
                                                                                            George C. Green
         

  • George C. Green

         The major problem with the music scene in New Orleans is that the “industry” is so fragmented. Practically every musician in Big Easy is a “BAND LEADER” and every vocalist is a SINGER/SONG WRITER! Musicians don’t work together, everybody wants to be “the best”. Musicians can tell you, without hesitation, what’s wrong with every other band/musician. They completely overlook the history of the busines!; Brodway was built on TIN PAN ALLEY; a collection of song writers and publishers; “Rock&roll was bolstered by such enterprises as THE BRILL BUILDING, another collection of writers and publishers. Country music is fueled by the writers and publishers on MUSIC ROW and MUSIC SQUARE; more writers and publishers. Motown was built pushed to its heights by a cadre of song writers; SMOKEY ROBINSON, HOLLAND, DOZIER and HOLLAND, ASHFORD and SIMPSON, TOM BELL and LINDA CREED were the top of the heap. The studio musicians who “made the sessions” and created the music were accomplished Jazz musicians who had the dexteriety and ability to manipulate the music and turn a basic song into a finished product. In the 50s when New Orleans produced its biggest catalouge of music, it was Jazz musicians who manned the studios; ALVIN “RED” TYLER, TEDDY RILEY, ALBERT “JUNE” GARDNER, PETER “CHUCK” BADIE, EDWARD FRANK, EARL PLAMER,CLARENCE FORD, HERBERT HARDESTY; et al. If Jazz isn’t making much money why not play some funk, make some money then go play Jazz for the love of the art? The “Jazz” musicians are so full of themselves they think they can satisfy and audience with “how good they play” their instruments. Jazz has a shrinking market and you can not get no blood from no turnip; if it aint there, it aint there!
         New Orleans is in the “MUSIC business” but all efforts are geared to launching into the “RECORD  business”. The record business is about selling personalities while the music business is about selling music/songs; big ol’ difference! You don’t need talent to “make it” in the record business, just noteriety; good or bad! 
         Don’t say I shouldn’t say that; tell me where I’m wrong.
                                                                                            George C. Green
         

  • George C. Green

         The major problem with the music scene in New Orleans is that the “industry” is so fragmented. Practically every musician in Big Easy is a “BAND LEADER” and every vocalist is a SINGER/SONG WRITER! Musicians don’t work together, everybody wants to be “the best”. Musicians can tell you, without hesitation, what’s wrong with every other band/musician. They completely overlook the history of the busines!; Brodway was built on TIN PAN ALLEY; a collection of song writers and publishers; “Rock&roll was bolstered by such enterprises as THE BRILL BUILDING, another collection of writers and publishers. Country music is fueled by the writers and publishers on MUSIC ROW and MUSIC SQUARE; more writers and publishers. Motown was built pushed to its heights by a cadre of song writers; SMOKEY ROBINSON, HOLLAND, DOZIER and HOLLAND, ASHFORD and SIMPSON, TOM BELL and LINDA CREED were the top of the heap. The studio musicians who “made the sessions” and created the music were accomplished Jazz musicians who had the dexteriety and ability to manipulate the music and turn a basic song into a finished product. In the 50s when New Orleans produced its biggest catalouge of music, it was Jazz musicians who manned the studios; ALVIN “RED” TYLER, TEDDY RILEY, ALBERT “JUNE” GARDNER, PETER “CHUCK” BADIE, EDWARD FRANK, EARL PLAMER,CLARENCE FORD, HERBERT HARDESTY; et al. If Jazz isn’t making much money why not play some funk, make some money then go play Jazz for the love of the art? The “Jazz” musicians are so full of themselves they think they can satisfy and audience with “how good they play” their instruments. Jazz has a shrinking market and you can not get no blood from no turnip; if it aint there, it aint there!
         New Orleans is in the “MUSIC business” but all efforts are geared to launching into the “RECORD  business”. The record business is about selling personalities while the music business is about selling music/songs; big ol’ difference! You don’t need talent to “make it” in the record business, just noteriety; good or bad! 
         Don’t say I shouldn’t say that; tell me where I’m wrong.
                                                                                            George C. Green
         

  • George C. Green

         The major problem with the music scene in New Orleans is that the “industry” is so fragmented. Practically every musician in Big Easy is a “BAND LEADER” and every vocalist is a SINGER/SONG WRITER! Musicians don’t work together, everybody wants to be “the best”. Musicians can tell you, without hesitation, what’s wrong with every other band/musician. They completely overlook the history of the busines!; Brodway was built on TIN PAN ALLEY; a collection of song writers and publishers; “Rock&roll was bolstered by such enterprises as THE BRILL BUILDING, another collection of writers and publishers. Country music is fueled by the writers and publishers on MUSIC ROW and MUSIC SQUARE; more writers and publishers. Motown was built pushed to its heights by a cadre of song writers; SMOKEY ROBINSON, HOLLAND, DOZIER and HOLLAND, ASHFORD and SIMPSON, TOM BELL and LINDA CREED were the top of the heap. The studio musicians who “made the sessions” and created the music were accomplished Jazz musicians who had the dexteriety and ability to manipulate the music and turn a basic song into a finished product. In the 50s when New Orleans produced its biggest catalouge of music, it was Jazz musicians who manned the studios; ALVIN “RED” TYLER, TEDDY RILEY, ALBERT “JUNE” GARDNER, PETER “CHUCK” BADIE, EDWARD FRANK, EARL PLAMER,CLARENCE FORD, HERBERT HARDESTY; et al. If Jazz isn’t making much money why not play some funk, make some money then go play Jazz for the love of the art? The “Jazz” musicians are so full of themselves they think they can satisfy and audience with “how good they play” their instruments. Jazz has a shrinking market and you can not get no blood from no turnip; if it aint there, it aint there!
         New Orleans is in the “MUSIC business” but all efforts are geared to launching into the “RECORD  business”. The record business is about selling personalities while the music business is about selling music/songs; big ol’ difference! You don’t need talent to “make it” in the record business, just noteriety; good or bad! 
         Don’t say I shouldn’t say that; tell me where I’m wrong.
                                                                                            George C. Green
         

  • George C. Green

         The major problem with the music scene in New Orleans is that the “industry” is so fragmented. Practically every musician in Big Easy is a “BAND LEADER” and every vocalist is a SINGER/SONG WRITER! Musicians don’t work together, everybody wants to be “the best”. Musicians can tell you, without hesitation, what’s wrong with every other band/musician. They completely overlook the history of the busines!; Brodway was built on TIN PAN ALLEY; a collection of song writers and publishers; “Rock&roll was bolstered by such enterprises as THE BRILL BUILDING, another collection of writers and publishers. Country music is fueled by the writers and publishers on MUSIC ROW and MUSIC SQUARE; more writers and publishers. Motown was built pushed to its heights by a cadre of song writers; SMOKEY ROBINSON, HOLLAND, DOZIER and HOLLAND, ASHFORD and SIMPSON, TOM BELL and LINDA CREED were the top of the heap. The studio musicians who “made the sessions” and created the music were accomplished Jazz musicians who had the dexteriety and ability to manipulate the music and turn a basic song into a finished product. In the 50s when New Orleans produced its biggest catalouge of music, it was Jazz musicians who manned the studios; ALVIN “RED” TYLER, TEDDY RILEY, ALBERT “JUNE” GARDNER, PETER “CHUCK” BADIE, EDWARD FRANK, EARL PLAMER,CLARENCE FORD, HERBERT HARDESTY; et al. If Jazz isn’t making much money why not play some funk, make some money then go play Jazz for the love of the art? The “Jazz” musicians are so full of themselves they think they can satisfy and audience with “how good they play” their instruments. Jazz has a shrinking market and you can not get no blood from no turnip; if it aint there, it aint there!
         New Orleans is in the “MUSIC business” but all efforts are geared to launching into the “RECORD  business”. The record business is about selling personalities while the music business is about selling music/songs; big ol’ difference! You don’t need talent to “make it” in the record business, just noteriety; good or bad! 
         Don’t say I shouldn’t say that; tell me where I’m wrong.
                                                                                            George C. Green
         

  • Nhemeter

    Right On Jan,

          We just completed our second year of the New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults and attracted 80 musicians to the city to spend a week taking instruction from some of our great musicians.  These musicians from 18 states as well as Switzerland, Argentina and Canada spent money at restaurants and clubs and bought cds, took tours and impacted the economy of our city.  We also employed 9 musicians for a week.    When we first conceived of the idea, we got very little help from anyone, people dismissed the idea, said it would never work, and were openly hostile to the idea and some of these people were musicians…. what!  We plugged ahead.  Must point out that Offbeat has been a sponsor since the beginning, so thank you for your support!

          This camp has the potential to employ even more musicians in our city and have a greater impact.  Imagine if we had 300, 1000 or 5000 musicians spending a week in the city filling up hotels, restaurants and music venues.  We believe this can and will happen. 

         This camp is great for our city and has the potential to have a huge impact in promoting and preserving the culture and music of our wonderful city.  Traditional Jazz is huge in Europe and we believe that more will come as they become aware of the camp. 

          Thanks to all the wonderful volunteers  and supporters who gave their time and money and share our vision of the richness of New Orleans music and it’s draw for people all over the world.

    Nita Hemeter
    New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults 

  • Nhemeter

    Right On Jan,

          We just completed our second year of the New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults and attracted 80 musicians to the city to spend a week taking instruction from some of our great musicians.  These musicians from 18 states as well as Switzerland, Argentina and Canada spent money at restaurants and clubs and bought cds, took tours and impacted the economy of our city.  We also employed 9 musicians for a week.    When we first conceived of the idea, we got very little help from anyone, people dismissed the idea, said it would never work, and were openly hostile to the idea and some of these people were musicians…. what!  We plugged ahead.  Must point out that Offbeat has been a sponsor since the beginning, so thank you for your support!

          This camp has the potential to employ even more musicians in our city and have a greater impact.  Imagine if we had 300, 1000 or 5000 musicians spending a week in the city filling up hotels, restaurants and music venues.  We believe this can and will happen. 

         This camp is great for our city and has the potential to have a huge impact in promoting and preserving the culture and music of our wonderful city.  Traditional Jazz is huge in Europe and we believe that more will come as they become aware of the camp. 

          Thanks to all the wonderful volunteers  and supporters who gave their time and money and share our vision of the richness of New Orleans music and it’s draw for people all over the world.

    Nita Hemeter
    New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults 

  • Nhemeter

    Right On Jan,

          We just completed our second year of the New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults and attracted 80 musicians to the city to spend a week taking instruction from some of our great musicians.  These musicians from 18 states as well as Switzerland, Argentina and Canada spent money at restaurants and clubs and bought cds, took tours and impacted the economy of our city.  We also employed 9 musicians for a week.    When we first conceived of the idea, we got very little help from anyone, people dismissed the idea, said it would never work, and were openly hostile to the idea and some of these people were musicians…. what!  We plugged ahead.  Must point out that Offbeat has been a sponsor since the beginning, so thank you for your support!

          This camp has the potential to employ even more musicians in our city and have a greater impact.  Imagine if we had 300, 1000 or 5000 musicians spending a week in the city filling up hotels, restaurants and music venues.  We believe this can and will happen. 

         This camp is great for our city and has the potential to have a huge impact in promoting and preserving the culture and music of our wonderful city.  Traditional Jazz is huge in Europe and we believe that more will come as they become aware of the camp. 

          Thanks to all the wonderful volunteers  and supporters who gave their time and money and share our vision of the richness of New Orleans music and it’s draw for people all over the world.

    Nita Hemeter
    New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults 

  • Nhemeter

    Right On Jan,

          We just completed our second year of the New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults and attracted 80 musicians to the city to spend a week taking instruction from some of our great musicians.  These musicians from 18 states as well as Switzerland, Argentina and Canada spent money at restaurants and clubs and bought cds, took tours and impacted the economy of our city.  We also employed 9 musicians for a week.    When we first conceived of the idea, we got very little help from anyone, people dismissed the idea, said it would never work, and were openly hostile to the idea and some of these people were musicians…. what!  We plugged ahead.  Must point out that Offbeat has been a sponsor since the beginning, so thank you for your support!

          This camp has the potential to employ even more musicians in our city and have a greater impact.  Imagine if we had 300, 1000 or 5000 musicians spending a week in the city filling up hotels, restaurants and music venues.  We believe this can and will happen. 

         This camp is great for our city and has the potential to have a huge impact in promoting and preserving the culture and music of our wonderful city.  Traditional Jazz is huge in Europe and we believe that more will come as they become aware of the camp. 

          Thanks to all the wonderful volunteers  and supporters who gave their time and money and share our vision of the richness of New Orleans music and it’s draw for people all over the world.

    Nita Hemeter
    New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults 

  • Nhemeter

    Right On Jan,

          We just completed our second year of the New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults and attracted 80 musicians to the city to spend a week taking instruction from some of our great musicians.  These musicians from 18 states as well as Switzerland, Argentina and Canada spent money at restaurants and clubs and bought cds, took tours and impacted the economy of our city.  We also employed 9 musicians for a week.    When we first conceived of the idea, we got very little help from anyone, people dismissed the idea, said it would never work, and were openly hostile to the idea and some of these people were musicians…. what!  We plugged ahead.  Must point out that Offbeat has been a sponsor since the beginning, so thank you for your support!

          This camp has the potential to employ even more musicians in our city and have a greater impact.  Imagine if we had 300, 1000 or 5000 musicians spending a week in the city filling up hotels, restaurants and music venues.  We believe this can and will happen. 

         This camp is great for our city and has the potential to have a huge impact in promoting and preserving the culture and music of our wonderful city.  Traditional Jazz is huge in Europe and we believe that more will come as they become aware of the camp. 

          Thanks to all the wonderful volunteers  and supporters who gave their time and money and share our vision of the richness of New Orleans music and it’s draw for people all over the world.

    Nita Hemeter
    New Orleans Trad Jazz Camp for Adults