The New Orleans African American Museum has reopened

New Orleans African American Museum has reopened its doors

The re-opening of the New Orleans African American Museum opens the doors of hope and another chance at learning about the heavy influence and importance of African American history in New Orleans.

The New Orleans African American Museum of Art, History and Culture (NOAAM) was founded in 1996 (opened in 1998) and a federal grant of $1.2 million renovation and some federal grants were the driving force for the building’s first six years. As time progressed, eventual lack of funding caused the museum to close in 2003 and the pattern has since continued, with on and off problems due to funding and management. It reopened in 2007, but it didn’t stick. However, as the museum opened again on Thursday, April 11, so did a new source of pride and spirit. The museum features strong and informative sources of facts and artwork such as photos of a young Louis Armstrong and photos of the black nuns in the Sisters of the Holy Family convent.

The New Orleans African American Museum (NOAAM) first was founded in 1996, supported by the City of New Orleans Department of Housing and Neighborhood Development, in an attempt to show the importance of local African American history. NOAAM was created and has grown in many ways in the same location of the New Orleans neighborhood Tremé, a neighborhood that was once one of the nation’s most prosperous and politically evolving community of blacks by the mid-1850s.

With a place to expand and explain the importance of local African American history throughout New Orleans, this museum is a special place that all New Orleans locals and visitors should get out and go see! The museum will now be open every Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. or by appointment. It is located at 1417-1419 Governor Nicholls Street.