300 Songs for 300 Years

$ 39.99

OffBeat‘s 30th Anniversary book celebrating the New Orleans Tricentennial. Contains the 300 most iconic New Orleans songs (plus bonus songs we just couldn’t leave out!), from “Bamboula” to “Walkin’ To New Orleans” to “Back That Azz Up” and so many more. Photos, “asides” and commentary from OffBeat‘s team of writers, experts on local music, musicians’ favorites and much more. Edited by author Brett Milano. Paperback, size: 9″x 9″, 240 pages. Call  (504) 944-4300 xt 1002 for bulk sales.

“I picked up 300 Songs for 300 Years because I miss Brett Milano’s writing in newspapers like the Boston Globe and Boston Phoenix. During the ’80s, Milano reviewed some of the best rock shows by Boston-area artists and bands like U2 and R.E.M. who dropped by to entertain local concertgoers. His obvious love for music—and the people who made it—was eclipsed only by his writing style, which somehow managed to be simultaneously informative, generous, fun, humble, and insightful. Sadly, the Phoenix is long gone, and the Globe’s arts section has been reduced to a fraction of its former self. But Milano, like the true writer he is, has shifted his talents to the music of New Orleans. And what a testament he’s written. The first evening I cracked the cover, I ended up devouring a huge chunk of it, and couldn’t wait to return the following day. But this isn’t a book you simply read. Instead, every song chronicled begs to be heard, so thank you, YouTube and Spotify. And although the title is 300 Songs for 300 Years, that’s actually an understatement, because once you start learning the rich history of these songs, you’ll want to listen to various versions of them as they’re sung and played by various artists who’ve recorded them over decades laced with triumph, challenge, and, of course pain. From Louis Armstrong’s ‘Heebie Jeebies’ and Jelly Roll Morton’s ‘Black Bottom Stomp’ to ‘Such a Night’ by Dr. John, and Hurray for the Riff Raff’s ‘The Body Electric;’ whether you adore New Orleans and its music, are simply curious about it, or are somewhere in the middle, you’ll be glad you invested in this treasure of a book.”—Sam Standard, Amazon

“Only once in a lifetime, and in this case, for our 300th year as a city, do we have the opportunity to see an historic compilation of the great artists and music that have been generated by our richly authentic culture. In this book, so expertly done, OffBeat has presented to the world and future generations what is the real magic of our community—the music that has brought us together as a people.”—Mark Romig President and CEO New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation

“What I expected was a history of great New Orleans songs and songwriters, but what I got was a reminder that these songs are touchstones for times in our lives. I learned how to dance to Art Neville’s “All These Things.” I listened to Fats Domino when I was in my twenties, driving a truck for a living and dreaming of better days. I sang and cried to Susan Cowsill’s “Crescent City Sneaux” trying to figure out life after Katrina. The music of New Orleans is part of me wherever I go and these songs are the road maps to who I was and how I got here today.”—Paul Sanchez, New Orleans songwriter

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OffBeat‘s 30th Anniversary book celebrating New Orleans Tricentennial. Contains the 300 most iconic New Orleans songs (plus bonus songs we just couldn’t leave out!), from “Bamboula” to “Walkin’ To New Orleans” to “Back That Azz Up” and so many more. Photos, “asides” and commentary from OffBeat‘s team of writers, experts on local music, musicians’ favorites and much more. Edited by author Brett Milano. Paperback, size: 9″x 9″, 240 pages. Call  (504) 944-4300 xt 1002 for bulk sales.

“I picked up 300 Songs for 300 Years because I miss Brett Milano’s writing in newspapers like the Boston Globe and Boston Phoenix. During the ’80s, Milano reviewed some of the best rock shows by Boston-area artists and bands like U2 and R.E.M. who dropped by to entertain local concertgoers. His obvious love for music—and the people who made it—was eclipsed only by his writing style, which somehow managed to be simultaneously informative, generous, fun, humble, and insightful. Sadly, the Phoenix is long gone, and the Globe’s arts section has been reduced to a fraction of its former self. But Milano, like the true writer he is, has shifted his talents to the music of New Orleans. And what a testament he’s written. The first evening I cracked the cover, I ended up devouring a huge chunk of it, and couldn’t wait to return the following day. But this isn’t a book you simply read. Instead, every song chronicled begs to be heard, so thank you, YouTube and Spotify. And although the title is 300 Songs for 300 Years, that’s actually an understatement, because once you start learning the rich history of these songs, you’ll want to listen to various versions of them as they’re sung and played by various artists who’ve recorded them over decades laced with triumph, challenge, and, of course pain. From Louis Armstrong’s “Heebie Jeebies” and Jelly Roll Morton’s “Black Bottom Stomp” to “Such a Night” by Dr. John, and Hurray for the Riff Raff’s “The Body Electric;” whether you adore New Orleans and its music, are simply curious about it, or are somewhere in the middle, you’ll be glad you invested in this treasure of a book.”—Sam Standard, Amazon

“What I expected was a history of great New Orleans songs and songwriters, but what I got was a reminder that these songs are touchstones for times in our lives. I learned how to dance to Art Neville’s “All These Things.” I listened to Fats Domino when I was in my twenties, driving a truck for a living and dreaming of better days. I sang and cried to Susan Cowsill’s “Crescent City Sneaux” trying to figure out life after Katrina. The music of New Orleans is part of me wherever I go and these songs are the road maps to who I was and how I got here today.”—Paul Sanchez, New Orleans songwriter

“Only once in a lifetime, and in this case, for our 300th year as a city, do we have the opportunity to see an historic compilation of the great artists and music that have been generated by our richly authentic culture. In this book, so expertly done, OffBeat has presented to the world and future generations what is the real magic of our community—the music that has brought us together as a people.”—Mark Romig President and CEO New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation