Let’s Just Shut Frenchmen Street Down

Do you love music? Do you love Frenchmen Street?

Your days of enjoying this only-in-New Orleans phenomenon of a live music street may soon be coming to an end.

I wrote in my blog last week about the attempt by the city—which should be embracing Frenchmen Street as the current epicenter of local live music in New Orleans—to close down music on the street. A serious crackdown started last week with citations being issued for several clubs (including Maison, Mojito’s, BMC and Vaso) and a lawsuit being filed against the Balcony Music Club (BMC) by Dr. Travis Kenny, who rents the property at 510 Esplanade Avenue, which is just next door to BMC.

Both the pro-music and anti-noise groups are becoming more and more polarized on this issue. We assume that the anti-noise people are numbered among the anti-music people too, since—let’s face it—they target music as the main source of their complaints.

Let's get rid of those crowds, shall we?

Almost everything I’ve heard or read in local mainstream media has focused on the noise on Bourbon Street, which overall has escalated over the past few years. The fact of the matter is that most of the bars on Bourbon that offer music are in compliance with the current laws; there are two or three operators who flout the regulations, and who instigate noise “wars” on Bourbon: e.g., Club A has music at a reasonable level; Club B thinks that if its music is louder than Club A’s, more people will hear it and will go into their bar. So Club B cranks up the music. Club A then tries to outdo Club B, Club B reciprocates, and the music gets ear-splittingly loud. Then there are the issues with non-bar retailers who blast music from speakers into the street to try to attract customers. The music clubs have to compete against them as well. It makes for an ongoing loudness.

It’s really the worst during special events, particularly sporting events. Those crowds are notoriously loud, and everyone cranks up the music to be heard above the crowd noises.

I wonder why the city hasn’t required that duct tape on your mouth or muzzles be mandatory for people on Bourbon Street so they can keep the ambient crowd noise down. That sounds ridiculous, but it’s just as ridiculous to ask music clubs to keep from playing music at a level that can be heard by crowds outside their doors. This is the nature of a street that provides entertainment.

It’s a fact that music adds to the spirit and atmosphere of Bourbon. Can you imagine Bourbon Street with all the music kept behind closed doors at a level than can only be heard indoors? This isn’t feasible. It’s not what the city needs.

Ditto on Frenchmen Street.

Unfortunately, some years ago, Frenchmen Street was subjected to a “cultural district overlay” zoning ordinance which only allows certain activities on the street. There are only a few alcohol licensees who don’t serve food who are allowed to offer live amplified music. Otherwise, an establishment has to be considered a restaurant to offer live music, and music in restaurants cannot be amplified and is supposed to consist of no more than three musicians. Clearly, there are multiple problems with this ordinance in allowing music to flourish and grow the way it has on Frenchmen. Thus, it seems that most of the places who offer music may be doing so illegally. But, in rather typical New Orleans fashion, everyone has looked the other way, and the music scene has grown and flourished on Frenchmen, amplified music and all.

No more.

The very vocal and well-funded minority of serial complainants on loud music is seriously trying to shut down music on Frenchmen Street.

They contend that they’re not trying to stop the music, they only want the loud music to stop. I think they’re going after the wrong people. Why don’t they just find a way to get rid of the noisy crowds in the Quarter and on Frenchmen? That would be a first step. If there are no crowds, the music isn’t going to be as loud. This is a fact.

Again, this sounds totally ridiculous, and, of course, it is.

My contention is that this city—which is known worldwide for its musical culture—is shooting itself in the foot internationally by not embracing music, which admittedly, is occasionally louder than it should be. The lawsuits, the negative media on “noise” (read music), the bogus web sites (hearnolamusic.org, that asks you to sign a petition to control music) are led by a small group of people who say they just can’t tolerate the noise. The city and the mainstream media seem to have bought into this stupid, selfish crusade that’s attempting to turn New Orleans into Blandtown, primarily because the publicity campaign that’s behind it is well-funded and supported by the money of a local wealthy plaintiff attorney, Stuart Smith (Smith-Stag), who has been attempting to shut down music in the Quarter since he bought a residence there on St. Philip Street. He and his firm are now also focusing attacks on Frenchmen Street clubs.  All the negative publicity about noise in the Quarter, the web site previously mentioned, the lawsuits, and the most vocal groups about Quarter and Frenchmen Street noise are all being controlled by Mr. Smith. He even has one of his former employees involved in the noise issue in Councilman Gisleson-Palmer’s office. Talk about a puppet master!

Control the crowd noise, and you control the loudness. Allow the people who complain about the music to control our musical culture, and you kill it. If you can’t stand the noise in the Quarter or on Frenchmen Street, then you need to live elsewhere and quit your bitching. Put in place some noise ordinances that take the nature of this unique city into account (we aren’t a city that closes down at 1 a.m.) and don’t try to model our culture and business on another city. Give the police the ability to crack down and enforce noise laws with enforcement tactics that have teeth. If bars and music clubs are consistently creating noise issues, give them some options that will still allow them to continue in business (such as tax incentives for installing noise-proof barriers or insulation).

I have news for the people who complain about the music: without the Quarter businesses and the music clubs on Frenchmen Street, there would be no New Orleans as we know it. No visitors. No tax revenues to subsidize your ability to live in these unique neighborhoods. Keeping up this campaign against music and “noise” is a totally selfish, short-sighted, non-visionary crusade against the very fabric of what makes New Orleans’ entertainment districts unique and attractive to everyone. Just get over yourselves and stop the attack on music and on the people who make it possible.

I vote for the music, every time, hands-down, and so should you.

  • Andre’ Bouvier

      As a local musician and New Orleans native, I feel compelled  to offer my perspective on this issue. It was my band that got shut down at Mojitos last week. While the customers sitting 15 feet in front of the band thought the music to be at a “comfortable” level, the New Orleans police officer felt we were too loud. (there was no decibel meter used). During our set up this cop paced in and out, like a tiger in waiting. I can’t help but believe that it was his sole intent to shut us down, even before we played the first note. Furthermore, he was unnecessarily curt and rude, marching in shouting “PACK IT UP, YOUR DONE! Bewildered, we asked him why, to which he screamed  at us, “I’M NOT GOING TO EXPLAIN IT AGAIN,PACK IT UP, YOU’RE DONE!” We were never offered a reasonable explanation  (I am presuming he thought us too loud), nor were we offered the option to continue at a lower volume.  He was extremely nasty, and we did not want to cause trouble for the owner or ourselves. We complied. (and all of the customers walked out).
      My band mates and I are typical of many New Orleans musicians in that we work very hard for very little. We choose to live and play in New Orleans because it feeds our soul(s) and because WE LOVE THIS CITY! The question is, does this city love us in return?
      I do believe that this is the voice of a well-funded minority who want to change the complexion of the city for their own personal benefit. “Clean it up… Sterilize it… Disney-fy it!” Take away the “grit & soul” of this city, you diminish it’s allure. Ask any visitor why they choose New Orleans as their destination. Repeatedly, you will hear,”the music and the food”.
      While (last I checked), we still live in a democracy, money speaks loudly! (there should be an ordinance for that!), it seems musicians voices won’t be heard until they are silent! Maybe it’s time for a long over-due musicians strike! We didn’t ask for this war… we just want to play on. One thing is certain, kill the music, EVERYONE LOSES!

  • Ssmith

    Dr. Kenny does not “Rent” He has owned this home for two decades. He bought his historic home before all the resturants morphed into night clubs illegally. You should get you facts straight. The owners of these resturants surely know what the law and their occupational licenses say. It all about making more money at the expense of their neighbors. Shut the doors. Hear the Music Not the Noise.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1418288016 Eugenia WhoDat Polos

    FRENCHMEN STREET IS ONE OF THE ONLY REASONS I GO TO NEW ORLEANS WITH MY TOURIST DOLLARS….TAKE NOTE..

  • Davidroe1111

    Call him up and tell him what youy think. Dr. Robert Travis Kenny M.D.504-821-9444

  • Dgaljour

    If this is true than he has been aware of the fact that BMC has been a music club (with different owners and names)  for two decades. It was never a restaurant. Check Point Charlies has been a music club for over two decades as well. He is living in a vibrant music scene and perhaps he should have thought about this before he purchased. What club on Frenchmen St. are you referring to? I don’t know of one that used to be a restaurant that morphed into a club. The loss of revenue for the city, employees, and musicians would be devastating for all involved. It’s bad enough that we can no longer afford to live in the Quarter due to corporate rentals and condos squeezing out the locals. Must we now be squeezed out because of those who want to further sanitize this multi cultural neighborhood? I am a 3rd generation Quarterite, and a 6 th generation Louisianian. In my experience when the locals are able to afford to live in this neighborhood, everyone gets along and music clubs are just a part of the tapestry of life. In other words, we get it. Dr. Kenny should too.

  • CHARLOTTEOINVIOLET

    THESE PEOPLE WHO DO NOT APPROVE OF OUR CITY FOR IT’S MUSIC, SHOULD JUST LEAVE. MOVE OUT OF THE CITY, GO TO THE OUTER PARTS OF THE CITY OR BETTER YET, JUST LEAVE ALL TOGETHER. NEW ORLEANS HAS ALWAYS BEEN KNOWN EVEN BEFORE SOME OF THESE PEOPLE WERE EVEN BORN FOR IT’S MUSIC AND FUN. THESE PEOPLE ARE JUST TROUBLE MAKERS, BORED OR UNHAPPY WITH THEIR OWN LIVES SO THEY WANT TO HARM OUR CITY AND IT’.S TOURIST BY START UP TROUBLE. i FOR ONE, lOVE THE MUSIC OF BOURBON STREET, FRENCHMEN AND ALL THE OTHER PLACES IN THE GREATEST CITY IN THE WORLD NEW ORLEANS WHERE I WAS BORN AND RAISED WITH IT’S MUSIC AND THE LAUGHTER AND HAPPINESS OF IT’S CROWDS. SO YOU PEOPLE WHO DO NOT LIKE IT, MOVE!!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003365480641 Sarah Clare

    Let’s face it folks go to NO for a good time, they know the rep of the city & in my opinion if they want a quiet evening they should have gone to some b&b in some sleepy little town & sipped tea, as a former resident of Vegas ( LOVE IT STILL) we know the strip is a place folks come to have a heck of a good time, if we want peace & quiet we don’t go there, it’s that simple. I myself do not get loud & party often but folks that do have that right & frankly if you in NO shut down the atmosphere folks will head back to VEGAS & they will welcome your dime, I for one would love to move home, so with the influx of tourist perhaps jobs & growth will come back, think about that NO. You want to give your tourism away?  

  • The Mighty Sarcastro

    I saw Ssmith’s comment and decided to investigate.

    510 Esplanade is owned by a Richard Levine.Robert T. Kenny, however, owns the property at 524 Esplanade and has since 1992.

    It took me all of 30 seconds to find this information on the Orleans Parish assessor’s site. So, my question is: Where did Jan Ramsey get her information that he rents the place at 510? Not that I’m entirely sympathetic to Kenny’s cause, but when a writer can’t check the facts on something that simple, it brings into question the rest of the article.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003365480641 Sarah Clare

    So sorry, I hear the cops in NO are  well, lets just say not quite on the ball, in Vegas a cop that acted that way would be looking for work, I know I worked with several, they understood they got to live in Vegas because tourist brought in cash, and as long as it wasn’t hurting anyone no crimes been broken. If it was to loud that cop should have gone in & told you to turn the music down  there’d been a complaint at which time it could have been settled with Chamber of Commerce or whatever board you folks have to oversee business disputes. My son & daughter-in-law love NO & hope to retire there, he is career military, if they keep acting this way in NO though they may decide to go back to Vegas.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003365480641 Sarah Clare

    Business is all about serving your customer base, THE CUSTOMERS ALWAYS RIGHT!!!! Please take note to comments here, and fact is NO is not known for being a sleepy little village, it is the  soul of the South so to speak, loud, proud & jazzin’ it up. 

  • MPW

    Having had problems with cops and neighbors bothering me about the parties in my yard I can attest that a cop NEEDS to have a decibel meter to prove that you are in violation. He can’t just guess based on his opinion. The problem there is, with New Orleans cops, if you even seem like you MIGHT stick up for yourself and the letter of the law, you’ll end up in OPP. You didn’t have to stop playing until the cop brought a decibel meter, because there’s a good chance he was wrong. But then you just aren’t allowed to open your mouth because so many local cops are bullies.

  • Velvethammerproductions

    I live in Sarasota Florida, home of one of the most noxious noise ordinances ever.  The same old story.  People with money move in near the clubs, want to shut the clubs down.  They pulled an ancient ordinance out of the closet and now after 10 p.m. the noise ordinance has just about eliminated outdoor live music in our city.  Once a vibrant tourist hub, now the city is dying, all to please the owners of the giant condos that front on the bay or on the keys. 
    Music is not noise. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/ellen.attar Ellen Howard Attar

    I agree with you. Years ago, I watched a few angry men shut down some of the best bars to hear music in the Treme. With the demise of those clubs we lost a rich piece of historical culture. Although Frenchman Street doesn’t have the history behind it, it has slowly grown to become the epicenter of a lively and exciting music culure and it would be a shame to lose it or to water it down. I wish them all the best of luck and hope they find a good team of lawyers.

  • http://twitter.com/npridoja Nathan

     Dude, just move uptown.  Or to Metairie.  Kenner’s nice this time of year.

  • Cacksacker

      If you can’t stand the noise in the Quarter or on Frenchmen Street, then you need to live elsewhere and quit your bitching. – that says it all.  There are places for people who don’t like music in their neighborhoods and those are called Lakeview, Mid-City etc. 

    Bully cops and anti music motherfuckers need to move or be moved.

  • SqDb

    Kill the music, you kill the city.  New Orleans has just a few things going for it.  Music is at the top of that list.  

    Thing is, the people making these complaints…picture this: they get clubs/music venues shut down.  Those areas stop being tourist destinations.  Businesses close.  No new businesses pop up.  Urban blight follows.  Like your neighborhood now, guy? 

    Cops have more important things to focus on right now.  Like the violent crime rate.  

    Loud music?  Please….

  • Suz4gal

    I totally agree with you Desier Galjour.  A corporation named G. Bryant was the first to start breaking up the old beautiful apartments and shoving the local families out.  This was in the ’60’s.  Now it is impossible to have locals live in the Quarter unless they are very rich.  Locals MAKE the City, and the police and the politicians just don’t get this.  Not even Landrieu.  Dr. Kenny should move to Lakeview or  to Mandeville.  Then his peace and quiet could be assured.

  • SqDb

    Ssmith?  Like Stuart Smith (Stag-Smith) in the article above? 

  • Guest

    If you don’t like the loud music or crowds, moving to FUCKING METAIRIE

  • Janramsey

    I did check the New Orleans property database and saw (before I wrote) that the property belongs to Robert Levine. Since Dr. Kenny was complaining about the BMC, I got my wires crossed and assumed he lived next door and was renting. My bad, and I apologize. No, Kenny lives three doors down at 524 Esplanade, and has lived there since 1992. In 1992 there was music at the BMC location as well as Check Point Charlie. Why is he only suing now after living there for 20 years? I promise you, there was a lot of noise coming from the BMC location as well as Check Point Charlie back then. You live in a neighborhood that has entertainment (the corner of Decatur and Esplanade is obviously zoned commercial, for entertainment), you’re going to hear some noise.

  • Sboogie

    Ok so we all agree that this guy is nuts.  What’s the next step?  What can be done?  A petition maybe?

  • Zena Moses

    I Totally agree!! As a vocalist who perform on Frenchmen at least twice a week, this is craziness. First of all, it’s so hard to make a living when you have bands playing on the streets with full horn sections and compete in a venue with doors closed. This is how i pay my bills. I’m not selling drugs, robbing anybody, or anything else that can get me in trouble, but what I am doing is continuing the culture of MY city. My Dad played @ Snug Harbor for decades and he told me stories of how Frenchmen was where the locals hung and the venues paid..but now Not only we are underpaid and have to play multiply nights just to BARELY make it, now these out of town property investors want to shut it down….This is a sad moment in the history of New Orleans….this is what we was speaking of after Katrina when these culture Vultures came in buying up everything that was left. We knew these people would start a movement like this to change everything great about this city. I never wished any wrong on anybody in my life but this is destroying peoples lives. It’s sad It’s the people like me, who income is far less than $20,000 a year, shoot! Far less than $15,000 but we pay taxes in this city as long as we been old enough to do so. We helped this city to survive and now they want to Kill Us Off Spiritually, Mentally and Financially. I don’t know what will be left to do for the common folks, who built this city to do after the smoke dies down….I pray we survive this Storm!!

  • Dinaz1017

    Jan, do you know what is the current noise ordinance in place for Frenchman St.?  Is it different during the day and at night? 

  • Zena Moses

    Thank you very much for the info! If he is in Practice we shall strive in front of whatever it is he do to make a living. Do him what he is doing, us, common folks. We built this City with music. This sickens me to think one person with such hate for My city’s culture can buy property because he is a big shot come and change it! This is how I make my living the little living I have. I’m disabled and all i have is a voice and a heritage I will NOT let die. My band have changed people’s lives through music right here on Frenchmen St. every Thursday, Friday, Saturday or when ever else I can perform. We have to perform at least 2-3 days a week to Barely survive. And here this person(cause I want to call him something else) come and try to destroy us like this. we went through one storm and now we have to endure this one too!!

  • Jacob

    Frenchmen, Treme, The Quarter are all very special cultural destinations. Why move to a neighborhood that is known for late-night music, street musicians and revelry and then complain about the noise. Move to another city or another neighborhood and let someone who appreciates what it is move in… Stop the ordinances that are stripping the city of its unique cultural draw. We want MORE musicians playing music in the street, it is a great alternative to drugs and crime for youngsters and it is part of what make New Orleans the best city in the world…

  • Zena Moses

    As a musician who plays on Frenchmen St…the rest of the article is true. He is trying to shut us down…and the Police have been writing citations. I have been working at one venue for the past 5 months every Thursday. Working my way up to get a following and get my 6 member a decent pay. we finally got up to $40-$60 a man. which isn’t much but that’s all we have to live off. working at least 2-3 gigs a week. last week because the venue received a citation they closed the doors. we only made $20 a person after 4 hours of playing with no break. Worked our butts off. I even stood outside to try to get people to come in. But not being on stage singing so they can hear what they want to hear cost me. The Local Musicians are the ones to suffer. we have no other places to play. Bourbon is packed with bands that play cover songs for years. They are not sharing space with no other musicians. And they shouldn’t have to. This is killing the culture and the people.

  • Anonymous

    loud protesting at his house
     

  • John W.

    Though I don’t live in New Orleans, I see this phenomenon everywhere; when I lived in Missouri, yuppies would buy a “nice country home” and then raise hell about the pig farm that’s been up the road since Hoover was President.  I was a member of a gun club which had been in the same place since the late ’40’s; a developer bought adjoining land, then had the nerve to drag us into court over the fact that he could “hear gunshots;” gee, do you think?!  (He lost).  Where I live on Cape Cod now, rich bitches buy a nice waterfront home on the harbor, then complain about us commercial shellfishermen “trespassing” on “their” beaches as  we work the flats.  A jerk-off is a jerk-off, no matter where, and we just have to keep fighting them-kind of like living with occasional bad weather.

  • HK

    calling Dr. Kenny is a good idea.  His number is listed below.  Letting Jackie Clarkson know what you think is also a good idea.  She can be reached at: jbclarkson@nola.gov and (504) 658-1070

  • John W.

    In ’91, when I lived in St. Louis-another city with a vibrant music scene (though not quite like NoLa), we faced an action by the City to try to impose a performing license on us, and a tax on cover charges.  We all networked (and this was way before facebook, etc. ) and presented a unified front to the city.  We demanded-and got-a mass meeting with the board of Aldermen and the License Collector at  a large local concert venue, and we prevailed.  You can too.  Network, pitch in your dollars and cents, borrow or rent a hall and have a meeting, and surely among you there is an attorney or three who will help your effort pro-bono or for a modest fee. You need to address this now, not later.  There is power in numbers, and thus no reason to let a few culturally bankrupt individuals with deep pockets ruin your neighborhoods and your lives.  Best of luck to you!

  • Angry Musician

     Name one restaurant that became a nightclub. NAME ONE!

  • nynola

    Mic check his ass.

  • Janramsey

    I have a question for this discussion…let’s say a resident has owned and/or lived in a property for many years before noise was an issue in the neighborhood. Say, for example, your house was one away from a corner. After you’ve lived there for 10 years, a bar opened up and started to play loud music that kep you up at night. What would/should you do?

  • Anonymous

    BMC is way too loud. I used to play at Checkpoint’s on Friday evenings, and BMC would almost always drown out the quieter songs.  Go see for yourself, well not anymore.

  • Anonymous

     Mid-City has plenty of places that have live music.

  • Anonymous

     
    Also, I’m in the anti-noise group.  Don’t assume all people that don’t want crap blasting from clubs and annoying people are anti-music.  Plenty of people, locals and visitors alike, complain about too-loud music from some of these places.

  • Anonymous

    Also, also, instead of calling the “noise-war” clubs on Bourbon St. “Club A” or “Club B”, name them!  If they start getting called out in the press and in these comments, they’ll act right

  • Josh

    I love Frenchmen street and spend the majority of my time AND money there when I visit New Orleans.

  • HK

    Jan:
    In theory, I think the Dr, his lawyers and others involved on “that side” are going about it appropriately — reviewing the zoning ordinance and encouraging their representatives to amend or alter the zoning, if necessary, in order to meet the desires of the electorate.  I disagree with what their Proposals, but not to their Method.So…….to answer your question, if a music club opened up next door to me (and “I was here first”), I would investigate the current zoning.  If the music club is non-conforming, I might choose to pursue through proper channels that the business alter its use in order to be conforming.  The business owner would have the opportunity to request a variance or re-zoning.  If the business WAS operating within current zoning, then the onus is on me to see if can gather enough like-minded people to influence the legislative process.To me, one of the main issues is when a Few people are able to influence what should be a democratic process that should be responding to a well-informed and active electorate.  The problem, though, is that people don’t engage the process.  If hundreds or thousands of people made it known to the city council that they will not vote to re-elect council-people who vote against music, you better believe that will affect the outcome of the vote.

    I’ve written to Councilwoman Clarkson today.  How many others on this thread have?  Please do.

    I’m a music lover and a music player.  But, I also think that volume levels have often gotten “too” loud.  I see people wearing ear plugs in music clubs.  That shouldn’t be necessary.  The owners of music clubs and the performers should strive to be considerate to the rest of the community just as we ask the good Dr to be considerate of the music clubs and community’s concerns/interests.

  • Fuq_U

    Looks like you need to get your facts straight buddy.

  • Metairie

    But seriously man, just move to the burbs. Why force your wants on people?

  • http://www.facebook.com/dustan.chiasson Dustan Chiasson

    Dont want the noise Doc? Move to Kenner “bra” ill help you load the Uhaul!

  • Anonymous

    What band are in you in?  What do you play?  Where do you play?  Try playing a gig while getting drowned out by the club across the street.

    This doctor is going overboard trying to shut places down, but some of them ARE simply too fucking loud.  Don’t tell me where to live, dickbreath.

  • Zena Moses

    I am in a band Rue Fiya and I play @ BMC, Blue Nile, Vaso, Cafe Negril & Maison and haven’t had no problem with the music. No need for name calling because this is affecting everyone. This is how I make my living what little it is. This is all I have. In Marketing, on Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays people want to dance so I giving people what they want…Upbeat music to be heard as more people walk by. It gets their attention and they come in, point blank. I do throw in some slow songs because we give them a show not all night noise. Now I can’t speak for everyone who plays on Frenchmen but I can speak for myself and others like me, who is born and raised in New Orleans and have witnessed this city go through many changes. The music is everything that helps mold our history. When people started purchasing property in places they don’t know the history then they come in an area and realize they don’t like something and want to change everyone else’s way of life. It’s wrong. Now I do agree on the sound levels being set to hear only as you walk pass a place not walking 2-3 blks away. When you purchase a PA system you ask the salesperson what is the area size for sound for this equipment. Why get something for Lakefront Arena and you are the size of Snug Harbor. But doors should be allowed to be open without been harrased by NOPD.

  • Zena M.

    I agree. I have been writing a few letters all day. Trying to put it as tackfully as possible. Also arranging a meeting with Musicians, Venue Owners and other supporters in the area to discuss what actions we should take. We WILL be attending the Council meetings also. Thank you for encouraging people to stand up and do something

  • Zena M.

    First by giving a warning…Everyone write to the City Council, Mayor, and State representative. Then organize a site we all can talk to each other and call meetings to discuss ideas. Picket and boycott businesses, investments those involved are linked to and support the New Orleans Musicians By any means!!!

  • No

    preach it! not to mention all of the buskers getting fucked with daily – “obstructing a public passageway” MY ASS!

  • HK

    wow…..chill out, dude.  I assume you’re asking those questions of me.  I’ve played in many clubs around town.  Have played in BMC and Mojito’s and dba.  Not Checkpoints, but I’ve been there as a listener.  I’ve never once played a gig in any club in town where outside noise from a neighboring bar or street musician has ever been a factor.  I’ve even played acoustic gigs and not had a problem with “bleed” from neighboring venues.  

    I haven’t researched the zoning to know which venues are operating legally, so I can’t speak directly to which ones “should” be operation and which shouldn’t.  If a business is operating illegally, I don’t support it carte blanche just because it presents live music (which I’m a supporter or) even if I’ve played there.  If BMC, just as an example, is operating illegally, I think they should step up and get legal.  I wouldn’t support them if they were serving minors.  Would you?  Understand…..I want MORE live music venues.  I want MORE music in this town.  In the clubs, on the streets, everywhere.  But the way to do that is to be a good member of the community and be respectful of the laws that have been enacted.  If you don’t like the law, get your supporters together and get a variance — Bachannal is a GREAT example of how everyone worked together and it’s now back in business serving food and live music.

    No one’s telling anyone to live.  But if you don’t like your neighborhood, the suggestion to move to a different one is reasonable.  It’s not reasonable to change the entire neighborhood to meet one person’s desires.

  • Matthew Brophy

    if noise on Frenchmen Street is truly a problem, how is it that the residential tower / retirement home on the corner of Royal (across from Washington Square) hasn’t voiced its protest?

    I’m not buying this as a legitimate complaint for one minute.

    Thanks, Jan, for bringing this to light.  Does anyone know of any collective on behalf of the musicians and art lovers who support Frenchmen to offer push back against the soulless entity of attorneys?

  • Plawmac

    I live literally next door to Check Points and across the street from BMC. I’m 52 yrs old, a professional by trade, so I’m outside the “normal” demo for this area. The so-called noise has NEVER been a factor for me,; and, most nights, I’m in bed before midnight. I’m so damn disappointed in our so-called progressive mayor. Just remember this at election time – with murders escalating, he has chosen to white-wash our city’s culture. Damn you Landrieu – you are a disgrace to our city’s heritage. 

  • Anonymous

    If you don’t want to hear this, you live in the wrong town.  Try Le Mars Iowa.  It’s nice and quiet,  but they still don’t like lawyers.

  • Anonymous

    Next he’s going to move to Paris and tell people they aren’t allowed to be French anymore.

  • Anonymous

    Same here, spent about two grand every trip, the last  6 years.

  • Anonymous

    It’s nice and quiet in the swamp.
     

  • Anonymous

    Sour grapes.  if you didn’t suck, you’d still be there.

  • Ralph

    The Dream Palace (whatever it is now), Cafe Brazil, the Apple Barrel and Snug Harbor have been there longer than 20 years playing live music … much, much longer. I grew up in that area and there has been music all throughout the area for EVER. Like, since it existed. No one EVER complained till the carpet baggers rolled in. Who ARE you people? Why do you move downtown if you don’t LIKE downtown? My family moved to New Orleans because they LOVED the music and loud, gorgeous culture.

  • Anonymous

    If I can’t hear the Fenns at Checkpoint Charlie’s next visit down, I’m going to unleash the zombie Apocalypse.

  • Andre’ Bouvier

    Matthew, an uprising of support is no doubt swelling! I will see you at the first call to order!

  • Crawford

    Unbelievable. Maybe the city would like it better if the city was simply empty – like just after Katrina. Thanks for writing about this Jan.

  • Music Lover

    Having just visited the city for the first time & spent the majority of our time on Frenchmen, my lady & I actually thought the music volumes were pretty tame. The only time we wished we had ear plugs for the volume was @ Tips for Bonerama. I’ll say this, you take Frenchmen away & that’s terrible for the city. Four days in town has us planning our next visit, but without the music we’ll be heading somewhere else. I hope y’all in the community can organize and preserve your beautiful culture.

  • Dalessi311

    How in the Hell do you rent in this Area and complain about music.Music has always been there.i say move your Arse to the metorie if you want quite

  • dk in pa

    I’m planning my 8th trip to NOLA. I pour over every page of my Offbeat with a fine tooth comb to plan each and every second and cram my vaca with as much music as possible..ALL kinds of music..mostly on Frenchman. I make minimun wage in healthcare and don’t just look forward to these trips, but sometimes literally might not make it through the rest of the year without them. If I saved, planned, flew down and sat down to a show and had cops come in and stop it…….talk about feeling ripped-off (not to mention mentally abused and broken hearted.)  It would be like buying a concert ticket and being told they canceled..tough toenails. I support NOLA music up here, outside Philly. I paid $42.00 for a ticket to see Walter “Wolfman” (no wonder musicians tour.) How as an “outsider” can I help? Call this councilwoman? I’ve raised my 23 yr. old daughter to “hear” NOLA music and brought down my 80 year old mother to the clubs. The establishment owner and the band involved should lodge a formal complaint EVERY time they are shut down without a decibel meter for proof, constantly fighting back-don’t let them roll over you! I personally cannot think of a more beautiful sound than Soul Rebels..ALL that brass, LOUD as all hell…that is NOT noise!

  • Concerned Citizen

    Keep French Quarter and Frenchmen Street Music Alive

    Sign and share:http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/keep-french-quarter-and-frenchmen-music-alive.html

  • Jstimack

    just signed…only #2 :(

  • Jorrox

     It seems I’m number 3 and I’m in Scotland. Something not right with that!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1043823553 Dana DuGan

    this is just pure insanity. Music=NOLA. Talk about biting the hand that feeds you.

  • Davidroe1111

    Please be polite. I believe the nice woman who answers the phone is his wife.

  • Whatever

    You are right, “A jerk-off is a jerk-off, no matter where” – but trust me, it’s not unique to the “rich.”  The only difference between a rich jerk-off and a poor jerk-off is the number of people they screw.

  • Skink Martin

    Free concerts at 510 Esplanade and 524 Esplanade every night

  • Skink Martin

    I’m #9 #9 #9 #9 #9 

  • MARDIGRAS2368

    Let me tell you something! As A NATIVE NEW ORLEANIAN WHO KNOWS THE VALUE OF MY CITY ANYONE WHO MOVES HERE AND MOVES TO THE QUARTER WHETHER IT WAS LAST YEAR OR 20 YEARS AGO—SHUT UP AND MOVE OUT! I DON”T  GIVE A RATS A$$ how long this FOOL HAS LIVED IN HIS HOME. It’s the FRENCH QUARTER THAT HAS ALWAYS BEEN THIS WAY. AND FOR THIS FOOL TO SAY HE HAS LIVED HERE FOR 2 DECADES MEANS NOTHING! HISTORY OF THIS CITY TRUMPS ANY IDIOT WHO WANTS MOVE TO THE QUARTER AND THEN COMPLAIN ABOUT IT! SHUT UP AND MOVE OUT! WHAT MORONS MOVE TO THE QUARTER AND COMPLAIN ABOUT NOISE! I have family in the QUARTER AND HE KNOWS WHAT THAT ENTAILS–NOISE! THEY STARTED THIS STUPID A$$ CRUSADE BEFORE AND WENT AWAY! WHY?!!! BECAUSE THE CITY KNOWS THAT IF MONEY STOPS FLOWING THERE IN N O   N  E  W   O  R  L  E  A  N  S!!! Sick to DEATH OF TRANSPLANTS GO BACK TO WYOMING!

  • HK

    Sboogie……YOU ROCK!  Thank you.  I signed it and am getting the word out about the petition.

  • HK

    14 now

  • RT Kenny

        There is no point in arguing with abusive Rush Limbaugh personalilty types, but for the rest of you I will tell my story.
           I tried to solve my problem with sleep deprivation by installing top of the line sound insulated windows. I installed 17 windows inside my historic windows at $3000/ widow. This helped some.
          Then I went to tthe Vieux Carre Commision to get approval for a 20 foot wall between my home and the next property to bounce the sound back to the street away from my bedroom. This was denied by the VCC because they don’t want high walls erected all over the French Quarter based on noise. The VCC told to go to the police.
    I have appealed the ruling to the city council. So, you should do your civis duty and show up at the Thur April 5 meeting and SUPPORT me. This may solve my sleeping issue, but I am not the only neighbor affected.
           Please be aware that the sourrounding properties are residential.
    I can not put a nightclub in my home. Perhaps you should go to the city council and have the zoning changed.
           I am not against music. There are nightclubs that are good neighbors: Checkpoint Charlie’s, Snug Harbor, DBA, Spotted Cat. I encourage you to go there so you don’t lose your hearing and require a hearing aid and disabilty payments when you get older. This is one way you could reduce the cost of medical care. The noise level is more harmful to the workers, musicians and the patrons than me. Think of it like alcohol. A few drinks per day won’t do any harm and may extend life. But excessive alcohol is harmful to you and other people since alcoholics frequently abuse their families, have auto accidents and end up with medical problems. 
            Loud noise obviously has made some of you abusive. 
           I am a family MD . My patients are entiled to a well rested doctor. I get woken up enough with patient calls. Sleep deprivation has been outlawed by the CIA as a means of torture,
           VCPORA and French Quarter Citizens are supporting this action.
           For those who think I should move , consider the following.
    I moved from the 900 block of Bourbon where it was quieter than Esplanade Ave is now. Of course, the volume wasn’t so high and I had high walls bouncing the noise back to the street. I moved to a residential area of the Quarter. It was quiet. Then ,restaurants opened that weren’t making enough money, so they morphed into night clubs.
           I have done 3 renovations in the French Quarter, 4 in mid city and 2 in the country. This does not mean I contracted it out. After Katrina, I was the first MD to return to Mid City area. I was the last president of Mercy Hospital. I worked on my flooded office every day for 3 months with only 3 sundays off. My patients would wander in and not recognize me since I was so dirty. My brother who came to help thought I was out of my mind rebuilding in the destroyed Mid City. I also had to redo 2 apartment buildings. I practiced  for 9 months with generators and cell phones restarting in Dec 2005 . I do not play golf, I do renovation in my spare time. I have  contributed a lot to New Orleans.
            The neighbors just want the doors closed and  the volume turned down.  There is nothing historic about amplifiers!
           To those xenophobes who proudly announce their several generation family history in New Orleans,  and don’t like outsiders I ask, are you really so proud of the racist past. Move on and stop singing Dixie.
            Here are some other ideas . Grafitti problem Why not have dedicated areas for the artists. I suggest the sea walls be used. This works in many European cities.
          Urban blight. Why not tax a building based on the square footage of land and  and building. The value would be the averge square footage for that neighborhood. A wreck of a house would then be taxed at the same rate as a fixed up building.
           The next natural disaster. Do you realize that the Mississippi river could shift during a large spring runoff leaving New Orleans and Baton Rougr with out fresh water?Install a cistern and get the water board to take water from a second source.
          Build flood gates need to be built at the opening of Lake Ponchaitran.
         Go In Peace,
             RT Kenny
    :
        

  • Ralph

    So, which, specifically, are the Restaurants that “morphed into nightclubs.” Name names. 

    I grew up in the Quarter, Treme and Marigny.Our family loved the noise, that’s why we didn’t move. I’m not sure why you would move to an area that’s loud, and try to change it.. Noise is bank for New Orleans. The neighborhood you live in has had live music for my entire life, so I’m not sure what you’re talking about.

  • RT Kenny

    Morphed into music Clubs
    Dargon’ Den used to be Thai food
    Tomitila, now Mojito’s
    VASO applied for change from restaurant to nigthclub, this was denied.
    BMC, originally The Mint, got an exemption from liquor license moratorium when it opened as a restaurant.
    Restaurants are suppose to have 50% revenue from food, have no more than 3 piece band, and keep doors closed during live music.
    RT Kenny 

  • Ralph

    The Dragon’s Den had live music it’s ENTIRE history, since it OPENED. The Mint ALSO had live music, and before that, it was also a live music venue. That corner, turning into Frenchman has had live music forever. You didn’t really answer the question: WHY do you want to live there? What attracted you there in the first place? You didn’t hear the rock bands sound emanating from Checkpoints? 

  • Andre’ Bouvier

    #56 (and Re-Posted)

  • Andre’ Bouvier

    Thx for your support dk… you can help by contributing your opinion in any and all NOLA publications (in the form of a letter to the editor), the Tourist Commision wouldn’t hurt’.. and by signing and re-posting the petition sboogie has shared. Spread the word!

  • McFlyyyyy

    I think the conversation is one dimensional. (As Dr. Brown would say, “you aren’t thinking fourth dimensionally Marty.” The decision does not have to be between two extremes: a) no music in the Frenchmen area or b) loud music in the Frenchmen area. Why not use technology to solve this issue?  With the internet and monitoring capabilities, all these lounges, nightclubs, or whatever, could be outfitted with decibel monitors and residents could have hard wired decibel infraction reporters. This could be monitored by the police central command (or whomever) and when there was an infraction reported, or believed, the police or whomever could quickly respond by issuing warnings, fines, or shutting the establishment down. Instead of resulting to the courts why not find a compromise, or is neither side willing to come to the table and talk? .As an aside: I frequent Frenchmen but I find the music is loud, although some seem to like it. If I lived there I would be mad about the noise (but I also wouldn’t move there because of it). 

  • HK

    RT Kenny:  Thank you for presenting your case in a public forum.  It takes guts to do it online where people can be abusive with anonymity, for the most part.  Thank you as well for the contributions you have made to this community; I take your word at face value and have not taken the time to verify your claims.
    Closing music clubs is not the answer.  I think it goes without saying that music is an essential component of the fabric of New Orleans and, further, a key component to NOLA’s economic stability/growth.Having music clubs operate within what the zoning and noise ordinances permit is reasonable.Enforcing the laws regarding music played on the street is also relevant.  Understand that I am strongly in favor of 2nd lines, outdoor brass bands etc.Having neighbors appreciate that living adjacent to legally operating music clubs and music districts can mean that noise will bleed into their property is also a reasonable expectation.Requiring that police officers enforce the laws properly and fairly (i.e. taking sound readings and documenting them publicly and sharing that data with the property owner(s)) should also be accepted by both “sides”.So, what’s the mis-communication?Is your lawsuit available for the public to read?  If so, where?What is the basis of your lawsuit and what remedies does it seek?Whether Mojito’s or BMC used to be a restaurant or not seems besides the point to me.  Are they currently operating legally? I’m familiar with Mojito’s.  I know that they’ve brought live music into their program recently and do it outdoors.  Did they receive a permit?  Are they operating within zoning.It seems to me that facts are facts.  Facts should be shared honestly and openly.  I’m not in favor of personally blasting someone based on a headline.

    Understand also that I’m not some “law and order” guy……I understand that NOLA has a long history of operating with a certain sense of “flexibility” with respect to cultural expressions.  But I think that New Orleanians need to step up and vote for what they feel strongly about.  Walk the walk.  If having live music is important, elect the people who share your views.  I think Clarkson’s “agenda” is NOT shared by the majority of the residents of Orleans parish, yet she got elected.

  • Toots

    Collect donations and make sure those venues have a good lawyer behind them!

  • The Mighty Sarcastro

    I appreciate the feedback. I don’t know the history of the spot and from your comment and others I gather that music in the building that houses BMC isn’t anything new. It is interesting that he’s deciding to sue now.

    Maybe he’s just become a crabby old man who doesn’t realize that area isn’t exactly suited for a crabby old man lifestyle.

  • Plawmac

    I live a lot closer to BMC than the petitioner, and the :”noise” has never been an issue with me. Earplugs doc, earplugs. A lot cheaper than a lawyer!

  • Condo owner

    Amen!  And I have a condo in the Quarter.   It would be a crime to silence Frenchmen.

  • Jimcorvair

    I believe the politicians and elitist property owners, who knew the muscial environment when they bought into the French Quarter are trying to turn it into a Disneyland style tourist destination. 

  • Marcello Amari

    Of course, the deep money in New Orleans is NOT tourist money. That’s small change compared to old Louisiana money, oil money, import/export, and shipping money, to name a few. To the folks who do the real big money business in New Orleans, the tourist attractions are just entertainment for their whales. Pure window dressing. They’re here because New Orleans feeds their egos by allowing them to live their pretensions to aristocracy. 

    If the rabble and tourists get too noisy they get squelched. This is an old story that is repeated in other major cities. Soho and the East Village in New York City got gentrified and Disney-fied. It’s much more egregious in NOLA because the culture in jeopardy is deeper, older, richer, and more genuine than any place else in the USA and arguably in the entire world. Don’t let the phony-baloney, good-ole-boy royalty Orlando-ize, or even Hampton-ize New Orleans. As for the police, where are the cell phone videos of this police abuse? C’mon, people, be crafty. The Feds are here to monitor this shit. Give ‘em something to work with. And play political hardball. Write to your reps on the city council, the mayor’s office, make counter-complaints. Just don’t put up with this shit. No hippie apathy. Pry your faces off those bongs and vote. Really.

  • Dsms74

    I’ve been coming to New Orleans since I was 2…my parents took me to the Jazz Preservation Hall many times. FLash forward 50 years,and my husband and I visited two weeks ago. We always avoid Bourbon Street,cause its not our thing… but that is not hard to do. Noise has never been an issue for us and we have stayed in many French Quarter hotels. This last visit was our first in ten years and it was better than ever, ALways something new to see and do..this year it was a late night walk to Frenchmen st. where we hung out at the SPotted Cat for hours, stopped in at DbA and ate at cafe Marigny. We love Frenchmen st. and N.O….it ain’t noise, its music…don’t buy a house next to the railroad tracks and then complain abut the train! LOng live Frenchmen St….by the way,I bet nobody in the Treme is complaining about the “noise” cause they get it.

  • Anonymous

    I echo Ralph’s inquiry (and again, hats off to Kenny for have some serious stones for contributing his much needed perspective).

    But I think we’re all a little unsure of the desperate need to take up residence in both the locations (Maringy and FQ) out of ALL the locations in the city and surrounding areas.  I believe we’re all a little fuzzy on that.  It’s like complaining that the water is too wet

  • Marcello Amari

    Can you say “Purely residential gated community?” The truly rich don’t need the tourist money. They would rather have quiet, privacy, exclusivity, private parties, and private security like…the Garden District or Fisher Island.

  • Midcity92

    Thank God someone like this guy has the balls to stand up for the residential quality of life in the French Quarter. If not for residential property owners like him, the entire Quarter would look like Iberville, Bienville, and Conti streets (oh, and we’d also have a riverfront expressway).  The lawsuit does not seek to end music as we know it on Frenchmen – just to enforce the laws that were enacted so that commercial interests and residents can co-exist in peace.  The most fundamental of our property laws states that “although a proprietor may do with his estate whatever he pleases, still he
    cannot make any work on it, which may deprive his neighbor of the liberty of
    enjoying his own.”  (And yes, that law predates jazz).  In the simplest of lay terms, it means “if you want to operate a live music establishment at all hours of the night in a mixed use neighborhood, keep your doors closed.” 

  • JAZZBABY

    I ALWAYS HEAD TO FRENCHMAN WHEN IN TOWN.  WHAT A LOSS TO SHUT DOWN THE AUTHENTIC AMBIANCE OF THE QUARTER AND ACCESS TO LONG-TIME FAVORITE HAUNTS AND ACCESS TO LOCAL MUSICIANS LIKE ANDRE’ BOUVIER AND HIS ROYAL BOHEMIANS.  MANY HAPPY TIMES SPENT THERE AND PLENTY OF MONEY DROPPED ON THE VENTURE!! AUTHENTIC MUSIC AND AMBIANCE IS PART AND PARCEL OF THE QUARTER AND THE EXPERIENCE WE DESIRE AND LOOK FOR.  MUSIC IS NOT NOISE!!!

  • Deanslist66

    I wish I had a tape recorder with me the first night after Katrina so that I could have gone out on Bourbon Street when it was completely shuttered, dark and silent. And under curfew! Wait, never mind, I DID have a tape recorder with me and all you would have heard on the replay was dead air. And cops ordering people out after dark to get inside or face arrest. Let me tell y’all this . . . it wasn’t fun or pleasant. It was sad and depressing. Like living in a Third World military state. An absolute nightmare! Bourbon Street without music? Unthinkable until then. Now that we’ve seen what THAT was like do we ever want to go back to it again? Likewise for Frenchmen Street. Groups of us sat outside the shuttered clubs, reminiscing about the day the doors would reopen and we could go back to our normal lives. And when they did we were there to celebrate and be happy again. Some middle, common ground has to be found in this ongoing dispute. People have a right to live quiet, peaceful lives and musicians have an equal right to make a living. The longer this battle goes on the worse it’s going to get.

  • CG

    You tell them Jan.  People come here from other places and buy property in areas they know music and partying will be done then once they get their joy out of it, they bitch about it. Why doesn’t this guy go live in Metairie or at English Turn. It’s nice and quiet there. Lets sign a petition asking this attorney to move out of the quarter. His noise is bothering us!!!

  • M. Schmidt-Rouvière

    I’ve recently returned to NOLA after a couple years away and was also living on Esplanade avenue 2 doors down from Dr. Kenny when i left in the summer of 2009. The biggest reason I came back to NOLA and bought property is the music scene, but lets be clear.

    If you don’t live in the quarter (which I have) or near Frenchman (which I do now) and you only come to the area to party and enjoy what the area has to offer then I really don’t think you have an objective view of the problem. I don’t think anyone is trying to shut down the music , what is being voiced by Dr. Kenny and I’m sure other neighbors of clubs in these areas is that “hey remember us, the residents of the neighborhood that live here too, sometimes we need to sleep!! ” We just all want to get along, remember its the locals that keep the businesses alive all summer when its too hot for the tourists to come! Of course tourists bring plenty of money to the city but musicians get a load of local support or they wouldnt survive. I dont think its too much to ask to be allowed to sleep sometimes.

    Of course if you buy property in the touristic areas you have to deal with noise, what make you responders think that nobody thought of that? How can you suggest moving? If someone put a nightclub up 2 doors down from your house would you feel the same way? Or would you just pack up your life and move because the noise was too loud? I seriously doubt it!! I think may of you just jumped Dr. Kenny without considering the facts, without empathy and without stopping to think about the ridiculousness of the authors claim that someone is trying to shut down Frenchman street!!  

    stop and think before you jump on the drama train. I assure you the people that own property in this city love it here just as much or more  than all you visitors do, because there is plenty of b.s. we have to tolerate to stay!!  Tourists, crime, corrupt polititians, weather etc. etc. If it wasn’t for the culture and food of New Orleans why would we endure all the problems the city has ??  We love New Orleans and we just want to find a way to all be here together in this crazy gumbo of a city, so simmer down you drama inciters and have a little consideration for your neighbors!

  • localmusiclover

     I have had personal experience dealing with NOPD on noise complaints in the area and although I found them rather rude coming into the situation, I found that being respectful and spending the time to talk to them rationally we were able to come to and understanding and shook hands before they left. I don’t think NOPD has a vendetta against music, they’re just being pressured by their bosses, just like any other job, blame the real offenders Hear the music- Stop the Noise aka Dr Travis Kenny, there are plenty of quaint quiet neighborhoods in the city you could move into, most of which in fact are cheaper to live in…. Sometimes the world isn’t just about YOU! Just sayin.

  • Alan Walton

    I spend a lot of money visiting NOLA every year. I don’t come for the aroma. I come for the music. NOLA without music is unthinkable. The authorities are trying to do something similar in Amsterdam. They are very short sighted and don’t realise that people visit for the way the place is now. They will shoot themselves in the foot then cry when the money isn’t rolling in.

  • Gssc4

    I only come so I can go to Frenchmen street and listein to the music. If you close it down I will no longer come. Are the people trying to do this crazy? Florida resident.

  • Gssc4

    He from Wyoming? That about figures. I lived there for 17 years and my soul almost died. The people are arrogant and boring. Keep the music playing. Only reason I come to NOLA. Restores my soul after my 17 year prison in Wyoming.

  • Robert Schooley

    Dr. Kenny fails to understand that there is a perceived conspiracy by certain wealthy, white upper-class men in New Orleans society to severely restrict and/or eliminate its black-based musical and cultural elements through gentrification and pulling of government strings.  Preceeding his case, there has been the closing of the Funky Butt and Donnas(eliminating music on North Rampart),  the hassling and/or arrests of street musicians, brass bands, musicians playing in clubs and even disruptions of the tradtional jazz funeral.  In all of these cases, “NOISE” has been used as a weapon of destruction.  His organization is falling into line with this movement.   
         In Orlando and Las Vegas, the entertainment industries are protected by Disney/Universal  and the gambling interests.  New Orleans is much more free-form and random.  It is also  harder to protect(lacking major industry resources to do so).   The government in New Orleans must protect its music or it will stop.  Universal already has its “Mardi Gras Days”-an extremely flavorless, homogonized New Orleans as seen through corporate eyes.  Don’t let this happen in the “Real” New Orleans.  

  • Sboogie

    Petition to Keep French Quarter and Frenchmen Street Music Alive.  Almost 700 signatures but far more are needed for greater impact.  Shooting for at least 5,000 signatures before presenting to the city attorney.  

    Let’s not let a few people determine the fate of music in the French Quarter and on Frenchmen Street.  At the very least, open dialogue can occur so that the end result can benefit all parties.

    Sign and share!

    http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/keep-french-quarter-and-frenchmen-music-alive.html

  • Bonnie Johnson

     I honestly cannot even believe I am reading this bull****!!! For over 100
    years the the FQ has attracted people from all over. They did not come
    because it was a quiet genteel place to pray and talk in whispers. They came
    because of the noise (music!) which is the very essence of what the FQ stands
    for. Partying and good times. Something they don’t have at home. So now
    because a handful of snooty holier than thou asses with sticks shoved so far up
    it, who have nothing better to do than go around regulating things that don’t
    need regulating, honest hard working people have to suffer! What will these
    prigs do next? Oh wait… the marching bands in the parades play to loud.
    So I guess next they will be only allowed to carry their instruments until they
    get in front of City Hall where they will then pretend to play while a
    recording is played over a PA system????? At an acceptable level… of
    course.

  • ck

    the RT Kenny defense: “But, but, I’m a doctor…”

  • Gssc4

    Zena…I came all the way from Florida Thursday night and loved your music!! My daughter and I bought a CD and have been listening to it since Thursday. We will be back. We have to keep the music playing and we support you and all the musicians. Just a note if the attorneys or Dr. Kenny are reading….I come to NOLA 2xs a year only to listen too music on Frenchmen street. I spend about $2000.00 every visit.If there is no music…I will no longer come to NOLA.  A doctor takes an oath to do no harm. Killing the music scene is harming people who play this music. The music that actually feeds them. If you do not like your neighborhood…move. It is rather egotistical of you to think the neighborhood should change for you. Either you change for the neighborhood or leave..not the other way around. What if somebody told you they wanted your office to move? Have some empathy and put yourself in the shoes of the musicians. The world does not revolve around you. You evolve with the world.

    Keep the music …..it is not noise.  

  • ESwanson

    If Robert Kenny doesn’t like his neighborhood, he should move. There’s a limited supply of housing in the Quarter, yet there is a large demand of people wanting to live in the Quarter close to music and nightlife.  Frenchmen is one of the world’s premier music destinations and its music attracts more buyers/renters than it displaces. With so few homes available, they should go to people who enjoy the neighborhood and want to be there.  It’s just one small neighborhood and we have a world of people to fill it.

    I could understand the City wanting a noise ordinance IF the market was different, and there was excess supply of housing without the demand for it. But that’s not the case. There’s no reason for government to get bigger and have even more control over our personal lives with aggressive sound ordinances. Just let the market take care of the problem. The solution is for Robert Kenny to sell his property at a large profit to a music fan. Kenny makes a profit and enjoys a quiet home, the new resident enjoys a new home near Frenchmen, the clubs stay open, musicians stay employed, and New Orleans’ music scene keeps attracting tourist dollars. It’s a win-win-win-win-win.   Kenny wanting the world to change to his liking is a win-lose-lose-lose-lose. Kenny benefits, but music clubs lose, musicians lose, music fans lose, and the local economy loses.

    The Quarter has surived for centuries just fine without big government dictating over-reaching rules. These people wanting to change the Quarter want to change what New Orleans is all about. This is a fight for New Orleans soul. 

  • ESwanson

    If Robert Kenny doesn’t like his neighborhood, he should move. There’s a limited supply of housing in the Quarter, yet there is a large demand of people wanting to live in the Quarter close to music and nightlife.  Frenchmen is one of the world’s premier music destinations and its music attracts more buyers/renters than it displaces. With so few homes available, they should go to people who enjoy the neighborhood and want to be there.  It’s just one small neighborhood and we have a world of people to fill it.

    I could understand the City wanting a noise ordinance IF the market was different, and there was excess supply of housing without the demand for it. But that’s not the case. There’s no reason for government to get bigger and have even more control over our personal lives with aggressive sound ordinances. Just let the market take care of the problem. The solution is for Robert Kenny to sell his property at a large profit to a music fan. Kenny makes a profit and enjoys a quiet home, the new resident enjoys a new home near Frenchmen, the clubs stay open, musicians stay employed, and New Orleans’ music scene keeps attracting tourist dollars. It’s a win-win-win-win-win.   Kenny wanting the world to change to his liking is a win-lose-lose-lose-lose. Kenny benefits, but music clubs lose, musicians lose, music fans lose, and the local economy loses.

    The Quarter has surived for centuries just fine without big government dictating over-reaching rules. These people wanting to change the Quarter want to change what New Orleans is all about. This is a fight for New Orleans soul. 

  • ESwanson

    When the govt gets involved things get messed up. Especially in a city with a long history of govt corruption and police corruption. If the City changes centuries of history, and sets a precedent that New Orleans music can be shut down, the door is open for money to silence music for good. Government overregulation will kill the local music economy.

  • ESwanson

    When the govt gets involved things get messed up. Especially in a city with a long history of govt corruption and police corruption. If the City changes centuries of history, and sets a precedent that New Orleans music can be shut down, the door is open for money to silence music for good. Government overregulation will kill the local music economy.

  • ESwanson

    Iberville, Bienville, and Conti: That area is less desirable because they don’t have the world class music scene of Frenchmen St.  Move some music clubs in the area, and renovation will follow. New Orleans music has done more for the Quarter than a renovating doctor has ever done. Don’t kill the lifeblood of your neighborhood. If there was no music, the Quarter would have become downtown Baton Rouge decades ago. If BMC and New Orleans music is shut down, it will all look like Iberville and Conti.  

  • ESwanson

    Iberville, Bienville, and Conti: That area is less desirable because they don’t have the world class music scene of Frenchmen St.  Move some music clubs in the area, and renovation will follow. New Orleans music has done more for the Quarter than a renovating doctor has ever done. Don’t kill the lifeblood of your neighborhood. If there was no music, the Quarter would have become downtown Baton Rouge decades ago. If BMC and New Orleans music is shut down, it will all look like Iberville and Conti.  

  • ESwanson

    Moving is the answer to the problem. With 7 billion people in the world, there’s more than enough people to fill the handful of homes near Frenchmen. People with lifestyles and preferences that don’t conflict with the music scene.

    Music scenes are fragile economies, and the smallest change can have a large ripple effect. A club gets shut down, musicians go out of work, tourism economy suffers. A young kid no longer has a club to get his start so there’s no Trombone Shorty breakout in the year 2020. With no fresh talent keeping American interested in New Orleans music, tourism economy continues a downward slide.

    What you are missing is this: You can move practically anywhere in the world and continue to exist. New Orleans music can’t move and continue to exist. There’s no where else for it to go. Residential zoning keeps most of the city off limits for music. You have the entire city and world to choose from. New Orleans Music is limited to small area. You have 99% and need to take the other 1% too?

  • ESwanson

    Moving is the answer to the problem. With 7 billion people in the world, there’s more than enough people to fill the handful of homes near Frenchmen. People with lifestyles and preferences that don’t conflict with the music scene.

    Music scenes are fragile economies, and the smallest change can have a large ripple effect. A club gets shut down, musicians go out of work, tourism economy suffers. A young kid no longer has a club to get his start so there’s no Trombone Shorty breakout in the year 2020. With no fresh talent keeping American interested in New Orleans music, tourism economy continues a downward slide.

    What you are missing is this: You can move practically anywhere in the world and continue to exist. New Orleans music can’t move and continue to exist. There’s no where else for it to go. Residential zoning keeps most of the city off limits for music. You have the entire city and world to choose from. New Orleans Music is limited to small area. You have 99% and need to take the other 1% too?

  • ESwanson

    If Robert Kenny doesn’t like his neighborhood, he should move. There’s a limited supply of housing in the Quarter, yet there is a large demand of people wanting to live in the Quarter close to music and nightlife.  Frenchmen is one of the world’s premier music destinations and its music attracts more buyers/renters than it displaces. With so few homes available, they should go to people who enjoy the neighborhood and want to be there.  It’s just one small neighborhood and we have a world of people to fill it.I could understand the City wanting a noise ordinance IF the market was different, and there was excess supply of housing without the demand for it. But that’s not the case. There’s no reason for government to get bigger and have even more control over our personal lives with aggressive sound ordinances. Just let the market take care of the problem. The solution is for Robert Kenny to sell his property at a large profit to a music fan. Kenny makes a profit and enjoys a quiet home, the new resident enjoys a new home near Frenchmen, the clubs stay open, musicians stay employed, and New Orleans’ music scene keeps attracting tourist dollars. It’s a win-win-win-win-win.   Kenny wanting the world to change to his liking is a win-lose-lose-lose-lose. Kenny benefits, but music clubs lose, musicians lose, music fans lose, and the local economy loses.The Quarter has surived for centuries just fine without big government dictating over-reaching rules. These people wanting to change the Quarter want to change what New Orleans is all about. This is a fight for New Orleans soul.Moving is the answer to the problem. With 7 billion people in the world, there’s more than enough people to fill the handful of homes near Frenchmen. People with lifestyles and preferences that don’t conflict with the music scene.Music scenes are fragile economies, and the smallest change can have a large ripple effect. A club gets shut down, musicians go out of work, tourism economy suffers. A young kid no longer has a club to get his start so there’s no Trombone Shorty breakout in the year 2020. With no fresh talent keeping American interested in New Orleans music, tourism economy continues a downward slide. What you are missing is this: You can move practically anywhere in the world and continue to exist. New Orleans music can’t move and continue to exist. There’s no where else for it to go. Residential zoning keeps most of the city off limits for music. You have the entire city and world to choose from. New Orleans Music is limited to small area. You have 99% and need to take the other 1% too?

  • ESwanson

    If Robert Kenny doesn’t like his neighborhood, he should move. There’s a limited supply of housing in the Quarter, yet there is a large demand of people wanting to live in the Quarter close to music and nightlife.  Frenchmen is one of the world’s premier music destinations and its music attracts more buyers/renters than it displaces. With so few homes available, they should go to people who enjoy the neighborhood and want to be there.  It’s just one small neighborhood and we have a world of people to fill it.I could understand the City wanting a noise ordinance IF the market was different, and there was excess supply of housing without the demand for it. But that’s not the case. There’s no reason for government to get bigger and have even more control over our personal lives with aggressive sound ordinances. Just let the market take care of the problem. The solution is for Robert Kenny to sell his property at a large profit to a music fan. Kenny makes a profit and enjoys a quiet home, the new resident enjoys a new home near Frenchmen, the clubs stay open, musicians stay employed, and New Orleans’ music scene keeps attracting tourist dollars. It’s a win-win-win-win-win.   Kenny wanting the world to change to his liking is a win-lose-lose-lose-lose. Kenny benefits, but music clubs lose, musicians lose, music fans lose, and the local economy loses.The Quarter has surived for centuries just fine without big government dictating over-reaching rules. These people wanting to change the Quarter want to change what New Orleans is all about. This is a fight for New Orleans soul.Moving is the answer to the problem. With 7 billion people in the world, there’s more than enough people to fill the handful of homes near Frenchmen. People with lifestyles and preferences that don’t conflict with the music scene.Music scenes are fragile economies, and the smallest change can have a large ripple effect. A club gets shut down, musicians go out of work, tourism economy suffers. A young kid no longer has a club to get his start so there’s no Trombone Shorty breakout in the year 2020. With no fresh talent keeping American interested in New Orleans music, tourism economy continues a downward slide. What you are missing is this: You can move practically anywhere in the world and continue to exist. New Orleans music can’t move and continue to exist. There’s no where else for it to go. Residential zoning keeps most of the city off limits for music. You have the entire city and world to choose from. New Orleans Music is limited to small area. You have 99% and need to take the other 1% too?

  • Garry

    90% of why I have come to New Orleans (from Canada) for the last 2 winters is because of the music. Shut the music down and I won’t be back. Frenchmen St. and Bourbon St. are huge attractions which differentiate your marvelous city from Fargo and Tampa and all the other homogenized carbon copies which litter the landscape of Canada and the USA. Back where I live, if we don’t like the smell of a hog farm we don’t buy property next to it. Of course, music can be too loud, but it doesn’t “sound” like that is the real problem. In all my frequenting of music venues in this incredible city, I have seldom had to exit the premises because of the volume. Your archaic smoking laws, your shortage of non smoking venues, are another story. Thankfully, I have noticed a huge improvement in that area in just the last two years.

  • Onemanmachine

    This entire country is turning in to a sick impotent police state…. The Right wing conservatives have lost their minds as their butt holes tighten up for the end of times…

    what the F***????????????????/ Mitch Landrieu where are you man? The politicians focus on the musicians and music lovers and want to crush us… because they are going broke, and can’t do anything to solve the real problems, the 300 murders a year, the pollution, so they turn their attention to those who are dancing and stomp on our toes…

  • Onemanmachine

    absolute crap… I’ve been drinking and playing music on Frenchman for 20 years… and the place has become safer and quiter than it was 20 years ago… it’s tame by comparison… ok… 20 years ago the murder rate in NOLA spiked to 400… and Frenchman and Decatur St. were populated by crack heads and gutter punks…

  • Angela

    The answer is simple, if you are looking for peace and quiet, don’t live in the french quarter, especially next door or on top of noisy bars. There are plenty of quiet places both in the quarter and the marigny. Even quieter is the bywater and cbd. Go live there.

  • Pavel Andreievich Chekov

    new orleans is walking the walk. here. on this board. telling you and the good doc to move.

  • Debra Amburn

    If the music goes away so does the city! How sad would that be.

  • bydabayou

    This is getting a bit OT but it is all so enmeshed…
    I suggest you accurately write out your experience and send it to the New Orleans Public Integrity Bureau – which is, of course, misnamed since it ought to be called the Police Integrity Bureau, but in any case they need to hear about it. This kind of dick dancing behavior or any level of non-professionalism needs to be eliminated from Our local police brotherhood. To Protect and Serve SHOULD be the mission… I pay a lot of taxes and won’t stand for harassment. I may take it to keep a knee off my kidneys but I’ll see you later. When I had one go psycho on me, in front of my child, who to this day does not like police, I was actually impressed with that Agency Division’s actions and seeming concern to rectify the situation within the NOLA police department. 
    No one should stand for that crap. If our police need to uphold the law, they can do it without treating decent people ( of any color by the way) like inferior or subservient beings.

  • bydabayou

    This is getting a bit OT but it is all so enmeshed…
    I suggest you accurately write out your experience and send it to the New Orleans Public Integrity Bureau – which is, of course, misnamed since it ought to be called the Police Integrity Bureau, but in any case they need to hear about it. This kind of dick dancing behavior or any level of non-professionalism needs to be eliminated from Our local police brotherhood. To Protect and Serve SHOULD be the mission… I pay a lot of taxes and won’t stand for harassment. I may take it to keep a knee off my kidneys but I’ll see you later. When I had one go psycho on me, in front of my child, who to this day does not like police, I was actually impressed with that Agency Division’s actions and seeming concern to rectify the situation within the NOLA police department. 
    No one should stand for that crap. If our police need to uphold the law, they can do it without treating decent people ( of any color by the way) like inferior or subservient beings.

  • Jmwillard1

    Later this month we will be visiting New Orleans for the third, or forth time. We keep coming back for the culture, the music, the food and the realness of the city and it’s people. Turn it into a controlled theme park enviroment and you will kill everything that is so great about the city. Mediocre people do horrible things. Don’t let it happen! 

  • http://festivalofthedead.com Christian Day

    Wow. Shades of my hometown of Salem, Massachusetts here. Years ago, when I refer to as “the condo people” descended upon the Witch City like a horde of vultures hoping to rid us of all things Witch-related, I made a comment to MSNBC that seems so appropriate now. “If I did not like the smell of Chinese food, I wouldn’t move to Chinatown.”

    Obviously, you must like the challenge of a conflict. Maybe when you’ve exhausted yourself here, you can join the folks in ol’ Salem for their hopeless cause too.

  • http://festivalofthedead.com Christian Day

    The only language people understand these days is lawsuits. These venues need to band together and sue like crazy.

  • Joseph morris

    I couldn’t agree more . These individuals knew where they decided to live! The quarter and Frenchman are some of the reasons I come back to Nola year after year! What can I do to help keep the music ?!

  • Stephen James

    Complaining about the sound of music coming from the street AFTER you have moved in there is as ridiculous as complaining about aircraft noise after moving into a house next to an airport! (And I have actually heard of THAT happening, too!)
    New Orleans has always been a city of music. Even in the suburbs you can hear the sound of music emanating from apartments and homes of most streets. THAT is all part of the ambience that makes New Orleans special. I even open my windows sometimes so that I CAN hear it.
    Any crackdown on the sounds of music should be on those liver-liquidizing bass sounds emanating from vehicles which cruise the streets day and night with the bass turned high.. now that IS intrusive. AND illegal.

  • Fleshorbones

    I’m coming late to the conversation, but as a French Quarter resident I have to offer my two cents. I agree that live music is essential to the identity of New Orleans, and that it is important for city officials to allow live music to flourish in the Quarter and on Frenchmen. However, I am troubled by your failure to recognize that there is a balancing of interests to consider. The character and beauty of the Quarter depends both on its music and its residential presence. You say that without the music clubs in the Quarter and Frenchmen, New Orleans wouldn’t exist as we know it. The same can be said about its French Quarter residents. The Quarter’s vibrance also depends on the people who live here. This is an ecosystem and everybody has a role in making this place what it is. Overamplified brass bands are not the only thing happening here. I believe you are being unfair to the residential population when you say “If you can’t stand the noise in the Quarter or on Frenchmen Street, then you need to live elsewhere and quit your bitching.” During my time here I’ve come to expect and even embrace a certain amount of noise and chaos on the streets. That’s just part of city living. But, certainly, even you’d agree there must be some limit to the level of volume that pours out onto the street. I’ve read your later blog posts and it seems you may have tempered your view, maybe just a little, and recognized that Quarter residents might have some legitimate complaints. I have no problem with Dr. Kenny’s efforts to have the BMC and Mojitos comply with an existing noise ordinance. I have no problem with our firefighters complaining that that they can’t sleep because of the noise. For my part, there are times I think its unreasonable that I’m being subjected to a 1 AM wakeup call from a grind core band at Check Point Charlie’s. It’s not unreasonable for Quarter residents to seek a reasonable solution to this issue, and, to my knowledge, no bar has actually been “shut down” (meaning that it was forced to cease doing business) and there is no evidence that the music scene on and around Frenchmen will shrivel and die if the bars keep their doors closed when music is playing. You seem to have some romantic notion that the Quarter’s full potential is realized only when the sounds of jazz bands are wafting aimlessly through the streets and drawing unsuspecting tourists into a siren song trap. This is an unrealistic and emotional response to a relatively complex issue. Clearly, a compromise of some sort is in order. To say, let’s “vote for the music, every time, hands-down” is a far too unbending and unnuanced position to take, where the music is not the only legitimate interest at stake. I respect your passion and strong advocacy for New Orleans music, but I think the issue requires a more diplomatic approach. 

  • Anonymous

    Hey, this is America, Dr. Too-Loud has an absolute right to live on Esplanade (if able to afford it), AND to sound-proof his house so that all he can hear is his own brain.  Likewise, he should keep his nose out of others’ business!  

  • Frank Bombaci

    your article is an inspiration. Amongst the revival of the city we all love, through the ashes a Pheonix will rise, but the Phoenix is never alone. Through renaissance and revival, there are always those who see an explosion of people, entertainment and culture as somehow a step backwards. The city was built on the unique regional expression of sound; stopping the this train that was bound for glory would be a catastrophe. musique pour toujours!

  • H.B.

    I live in Michigan. I discovered Frenchmen Street on my last visit to NO and cannot wait to get back there again.  It is unique, even to New Orleans.  Law enforcement ought to focus their attention more on preventing people from getting shot than they should on turning down the volume of the city’s music.  Violent crime is your biggest liability; music is your best asset!  Priorities people; priorities!

  • Mar

    After the storm, I started going out a lot more–to Frenchman, in particular. Often times I was there, most club doors were closed yet people outside were able to hear the music played   inside just a bit as one approached, sound level dropping off as nearing the doorstep of the next venue (except maybe a small blues joint that really needed the air circulation!). I (a local), and many folks who exited cabs, i.e., for the most part, tourists, would walk by a club, open the door(s)  to take in the scene inside and decide about going in. It felt like you were exploring and making discoveries.

    I think the one worry for a number of us was if we were disturbing the
    musicians/audience inside with our peering and obvious decision making.

    A
    sedate approach, like this, by the clubs draws people in. Or, we’d just (have to) get used to it. If this were tried for awhile, without
    club owners getting “louder” with their building façades, I would enjoy
    it more than dueling-genres-decibel-levels which, from info in the article on which we are commenting, seems to be rooted in fear, greed, insecurity, self-centeredness–nothing “for-the-good-off-all”.

    How about a small speaker somewhere in the wall around the door thru which passersby could hear music from inside?

    How could that hamper business? 

    I do give up the possible point that persons who are fairly inebriated
    might not realize music is being played or that the club is open.
    Perhaps that is why you need your alert-eyed door-tender/”barker”.

    I think my preference would be to be able to hear a bit of the music outside the club.

    Business owners–perhaps you should consider cooling it a bit. Get creative about increasing business. (During Jazz Fest, I overheard a club employee saying they were at fire marshall crowd limit  because they had advertised in a local magazine…)You, too, could injure the goose that lays everyone’s eggs, by short sighted, uncooperative actions. Educating your customers in a respectful way is key, too. I know some of you try to educate your customers with the occasional sign which speaks to buying 1 drink per set. I pay the door charge when there is one and put something in the tip jar when there isn’t a door, and regardless, I buy at least one drink per set and tip $1 or $2. per drink. Consistently. The 2 or 3 times, over the past 6 years, I didn’t have the cash, I did what I could and hoped my usual behaviour would cover me. …. I also wipe the toilet if I tinkle on it and there is tissue available (I have often brought my own tissue.).
    I may be unusual in all that (I don’t know and I certainly hope not)  but I really appreciate all the people who make it work that I can safely listen to and enjoy live music !!

    It is frustrating that people who move into an area populated with venues want to
    change this fact and/or the rules/ambience/etc. once they tire of living that way 24/7. (It can also be a little disconcerting that the ambience is a little “edgier” than is my personal preference with some of the people in the area who seem to be using drugs and living on the street.)  It is their right
    to try. The areas under concern at the moment were long ago much quieter. Things change/are changed.  It can seem unfair if these folks seem to have many more assets and an
    easier time of getting their way or are  joined by people who
    maybe are getting older, and want their purchase to “grow up” along with
    their own lifestyle. I do have sympathy for those who have lived in the area for decades and have watched it grow into something they did not bargain for and who only wish that ordinances already on the books–which club owners agree to by virtue of their license– be enforced. It’s not fair – and could be a little hypocritical- to insist that they get out because of the love of money of some of the more uncaring business owners.

    This can all be worked out.  Everybody just relax.

    What can you do about short-sightedness
    (particularly financial and cultural), selfishness, arrogance (once
    they’ve had their fun the party’s over), lack of discernment/disregard
    for the factors which bring “life” and refreshment versus a dead
    financial-musical experience and anyone in authority abusing/misusing power given them for the good of all ?

    Speak the truth in love, don’t fear trying things a different way before you are forced to by ordinances ad nauseum, and stand your ground. (Oh, yeah, and end racism.)

    Maybe seemingly unrelated, but needing the same kind of reasonable, even-handed, “no fear” approach is tourists treating most any street in the city as though it is a cordoned off area where traffic is expected to be impeded by their drunken–or shopping induced euphoric–ambling ways when crossing. Too, locals need to be brushed up on their responsibility to stop when someone enters a designated cross walk area (I’ve noticed this on Magazine St.). 

    Educating tourists, perhaps in the same way they are given tips re:crime, about their responsibilities as a visitor would do well to set a tone of increasing mutual respect which would ADD to the relaxed vibe.

    We who live here should not be expected to give up things such as access to our driveways  simply because a tourist-infused festival or locals-infused parade is afoot just as residents cannot deny someone parking on the street in front of their house even if it is the residents’ “regular” spot. We who live here have responsibilities along with the enjoyment we get from living in such a “fun” place to live just as do tourists who need to respect that it is not all fun and games and need to respect the people who live here. Either party should leave/stay away if they tire of those responsibilities. Too, residents should see improved city services when tourism is flourishing.(Where does the money go?)

    Honestly and vulnerably getting everything on the table with a good faith negotiation based on respect of all parties would iron out most of these issues  to the bearable agreement of all.

    You do need adults who know how to behave to get that far, that way, though.

    I agree with the last line of the article:

    I vote for the music, every time, hands-down, and so should you.

  • Mar

    Oops, left something out re:

    I agree with the last line of the article:

    I vote for the music, every time, hands-down, and so should you.

    But I can’t, and won’t, unfairly push anyone else to do so.
     

  • Mar

    I like Frenchman but, frankly, I want to hear more African-Americans playing–anywhere!
    Were the clubs in Treme shut down to keep the African-Americans from profiting from their own creation and to keep Caucasians supplied with music they didn’t come up with, yet have fun and earn money (however little) playing? That kind of stuff has happened before…

  • Walters_cori

    Since the hurricane, the whole city has shut down earlier, including the Bourbon St. clubs. As a musician, I absolutely HATE it when the club blasts pre-recorded music the instant the band stops, later into the night, at a volume way higher than the live band. It seems to me that if the “noise police” focus on this problem alone (including loud T-shirt shops blasting their 2-10K crunch right out the door), this would be a huge step, and the live musicians wouldn’t suffer, and the residents wouldn’t suffer, either, effectively “closing down” at an earlier time.

  • http://www.facebook.com/msmargaretann Margaret Ann Rouse Gonzalez

    always be polite, especially if it is not his wife- receptionists fade somuch heat as it is and jobs are not easy to come by…

  • http://www.facebook.com/msmargaretann Margaret Ann Rouse Gonzalez

    always be polite, especially if it is not his wife- receptionists fade somuch heat as it is and jobs are not easy to come by…

  • http://www.facebook.com/msmargaretann Margaret Ann Rouse Gonzalez

    always be polite, especially if it is not his wife- receptionists fade somuch heat as it is and jobs are not easy to come by…

  • http://www.facebook.com/msmargaretann Margaret Ann Rouse Gonzalez

    unless the lawyer isnt costing you anything….:/

  • http://www.facebook.com/msmargaretann Margaret Ann Rouse Gonzalez

    unless the lawyer isnt costing you anything….:/

  • http://www.facebook.com/msmargaretann Margaret Ann Rouse Gonzalez

    unless the lawyer isnt costing you anything….:/

  • 7th ward is home

    The Treme clubs were hosting mostly Black musicians- brass bands at the Treme Music Hall and Kermit at Litttle People’s Place. The Treme Brass Band at Joes Cozy Corner. RIP live music.

  • Anonymous

    There is a third approach: The music venues taking the time and spending the money to control the volume: Heavy Curtains, front doors sound insulated (and not propped open), house sound systems designed to be short throw – that is, speakers that do not project very far, ala the Bose “stick: speakers system, or using multiple small speakers to spread the sound out, to reduce point source volume issues, baffling on the inside walls that are designed to stop sound, not just control reflection, bass traps, carpeting, etc. You’ve heard those boom cars, right? well, they have this black sort of rubber sheet materiel that they use to stop the bass from shaking the car. And the stuff works, so what is stopping the Frenchmen St. live music venues from installing it? And fer gawd’s sake, take some time to get the room properly EQ’d., too. I hate playing in a room where the sound is hash and shrill – it does not have to be that way at all. And each venue should have its own sound engineer who knows the issues with the room’s sound and will properly mix the band.

    Look, the truth is the venues do not want to pay for sound control or for an acoustics control engineer to come fix the issues. Nor will they spring for a quality, properly designed and installed sound system, proper acoustic control panels and deadening material and an in house engineer. The fact they refuse to pay musicians anywhere near passable wages proves it. And because of the cheap venue owners who refuse to take responsibility for bad and too much sound, and do something to solve it, musicians and Dr. Frank both suffer. Musicians, cops. music fans, Dr. Frank, you should not be getting mad at each other. You should be getting mad at the cheap venue owners – they cause the problem.

  • Dominic

    Wife?  ROFL  Not a chance.

  • Dominic

    No, he’s from New York State.  

  • Dominic

    BINGO!!!!

  • Anonymous

    Having moved away from New Orleans to pursue a music career in other parts of the country, I have come to miss the dynamic of music performances in New Orleans. There is an equal opportunity to see great performances not only in the venues that rightfully charge for admission, but also in the streets, where the music is free. Free, not just monetarily, but as an express display of artistic liberty. There are so few places in the world that not only allow street performances, but are known for not only the quantity of street performances at any given time, but also the quality. I’ve heard amazing music along the river, walking from Jax Brewery to the Aquarium. I’ve heard amazing music walking down Frenchmen from Checkpoint Charlie’s to D.B.A.; Walking from Decatur to Bourbon… 

    This city is blanketed by music, and the people that make it. They are locals, they live, eat, sleep, and die by their craft. It is intrinsically who they are, and the tourists are aware of them. They stop and listen. They put money in the hat. They feel that they have absorbed a part of New Orleans, and their time there has become better as a result of it. Without food and music, why would people want to visit here? Those two things are the experience of New Orleans, and I would strongly contend that music is a greater anchor to the cultural economy in New Orleans. It is both the love affair and the soundtrack of a city with an infinite amount to offer.

    I feel that is the draw for folks when they determine that they want to live there. However, the people with the means to obtain these homes fail to understand how extensive it truly is. They, in turn, having a convoluted view of how the city is, want it to be molded into their ideals and their expectations. They don’t take the time to realize that these parts of the city were the way they were long before they arrived, but now that there’s a mortgage and an unwillingness to be insightful involved, they proceed to turn against the very things they were turned on by in the first place. This is an offense on a level beyond what they perceive of the performers, and the bars that house them.

    This is what they paid for. To live across and down the street from these venues and performing hotspots. If you look at a house on Broadway and St Charles, you know quickly that you live near Tulane and Loyola students. If you look at an apartment on Bourbon and Bienville, you understand that you’d be looking at living above a bar, most likely, a loud one.
    Frenchmen is absolutely no different. You get what you pay for, and you pay for what you get, and from the day you move in until they day you move out, you get it all.

    Don’t blame the musicians. Chances are, there has been a musician playing on your doorstep regularly for the past 100+ years. Blame your own lack of perspective. 

    I say they can go. Keep the musicians.

  • Anonymous

    Having moved away from New Orleans to pursue a music career in other parts of the country, I have come to miss the dynamic of music performances in New Orleans. There is an equal opportunity to see great performances not only in the venues that rightfully charge for admission, but also in the streets, where the music is free. Free, not just monetarily, but as an express display of artistic liberty. There are so few places in the world that not only allow street performances, but are known for not only the quantity of street performances at any given time, but also the quality. I’ve heard amazing music along the river, walking from Jax Brewery to the Aquarium. I’ve heard amazing music walking down Frenchmen from Checkpoint Charlie’s to D.B.A.; Walking from Decatur to Bourbon… 

    This city is blanketed by music, and the people that make it. They are locals, they live, eat, sleep, and die by their craft. It is intrinsically who they are, and the tourists are aware of them. They stop and listen. They put money in the hat. They feel that they have absorbed a part of New Orleans, and their time there has become better as a result of it. Without food and music, why would people want to visit here? Those two things are the experience of New Orleans, and I would strongly contend that music is a greater anchor to the cultural economy in New Orleans. It is both the love affair and the soundtrack of a city with an infinite amount to offer.

    I feel that is the draw for folks when they determine that they want to live there. However, the people with the means to obtain these homes fail to understand how extensive it truly is. They, in turn, having a convoluted view of how the city is, want it to be molded into their ideals and their expectations. They don’t take the time to realize that these parts of the city were the way they were long before they arrived, but now that there’s a mortgage and an unwillingness to be insightful involved, they proceed to turn against the very things they were turned on by in the first place. This is an offense on a level beyond what they perceive of the performers, and the bars that house them.

    This is what they paid for. To live across and down the street from these venues and performing hotspots. If you look at a house on Broadway and St Charles, you know quickly that you live near Tulane and Loyola students. If you look at an apartment on Bourbon and Bienville, you understand that you’d be looking at living above a bar, most likely, a loud one.
    Frenchmen is absolutely no different. You get what you pay for, and you pay for what you get, and from the day you move in until they day you move out, you get it all.

    Don’t blame the musicians. Chances are, there has been a musician playing on your doorstep regularly for the past 100+ years. Blame your own lack of perspective. 

    I say they can go. Keep the musicians.

  • Gianluca

    It’s always baffling to me that someone sensitive to noise would move to a neighborhood that has side-by-side live music venues to begin with. New Orleans is actually a very quiet city with only a tiny handful of exceptions – one of them being Frenchman Street – which, I hasten to add, is no secret!   

  • Kideggplant

    I think That the City will always and has always screwed with the Music scene in Nola.I too am a LifeLong born and Raised New Orleans Musicians.And every time a Good Thing gets Going with The Music Scene The City Stops it! Frenchmen Street has been overrun with Musicians not from Here Playing on the Streets next to Clubs where Musicians are trying to work.The Noise levels are almost unbearable for the Bands in the Clubs! The Vendors set up on the Street are totally ridiculus .When are they gonna crack down on these people?
    I mean I literally saw a guy almost set fire to the Spotted Cat last month .I got pictures and Video of the Fire.Showed the Police when they arrived.Next Day saw the Guy BBqueing  again in another spot! Frenchmen has turned into Bourbon just waiting for the Strip Clubs and T-shirt Shops.At Best its some kind of weird Bazaar feeling to the Street.

  • http://twitter.com/snackersays Joe Albin

    So if I want to do something about this, who should I write, what should I say, help me – help you.

  • PGunther

    Ssmith:  I’m a 10th generation New Orleanean and my great uncle used to own and operate a saloon on Frenchman (circa 1905).  My grandmother used to tell me stories from when she was a little girl peeking under the swinging saloon doors to see the musicians play that she could hear from the street.  That “music venue” is still a music venue today (Blue Nile).

    I get that it gets very loud at times. I’m sure Dr. Kenny’s not lying when he says it keeps him up some nights.  But the fact is, he knew what neighborhood he was moving into when he purchased his house.  Two decades ago, I was partying my ass off in that area.  It was a happening, loud, music district then too.

    As for “Hear the Music, Not the Noise”, the beauty and culture of this city IS bringing the music to the streets!  I mean really, do we get rid of all the noisy gatherings on the streets now?  That would include EVERYTHING that makes this a destination for tourism. i.e., parades, marching clubs, etc. Let’s not turn this city into yet another BlandTown, USA.  There’s enough of those already, but there’s only one New Orleans!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=23412980 Gretchen Gershwin

    Dr. Kenny and Dr. Smith, there are many quiet neighborhoods in this city.  Why move into a neighborhood where locals and tourists are partying and then try to change things?  There are many quiet neighborhoods in this city: mid-city, uptown, or you could even go out to Metairie. BTW, the Balcony Music Club was another music venue before it became the the BMC.  Maybe you fancy doctors should sell your homes, and move somewhere quieter.   

    This makes me wonder if Dr. Kenny and Dr. Smith are even from here, or if they are carpetbaggers from up north…  

  • Terry

    I live in Pensacola Florida and I  just got back from a trip to New Orleans. Where was the better part of my trip spent? FRENCHMEN STREET!  I listened to a brass band playing outside on the Frenchmen Street curbside this past Saturday that was amazing. I watched from a balcony as the day wore on and the scene changed into the nightlife that is so perfectly vibrant and geared toward music. Cab after cab brought people in and took them home. It was busy to say the least.

    To all the detractors, specifically Dr Kenny, I submit the following: In a city still recovering from a devastating hurricane, how is it even remotely sane to try and shut down an economic boom area? Those clubs are thriving. People like me visit the city not to quietly stroll around window shopping and having cappuccino and giggling quietly and thinking “how quaint” New Orleans is.  Travelers come to New Orleans for it’s culture, it’s people, the food, AND THE MUSIC SCENE!

    I own the oldest bar in Pensacola. It is in a neighborhood surrounded by nice homes. I am still amazed when someone buys one of these homes and then, and only then, complains that I am there and I am “noisy”.  Well I wish those people would just buy somewhere else. Same in New Orleans. Don’t complain about what makes an area unique and makes people come there. Deal with it or  move on. It is awfully selfish to expect everyone else to change when you knew what you were getting into in the first place. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/dani.is.great Danielle Small

    If you know of any real estate tips, give Mr. Noise/Kill the music a call…
    Dr. Robert Kenny M.D.504-821-9444.

  • Bydabayou

    You know, I don’t get why the good Doctor doesn’t just get him a set of nice soft comfortable foam earplugs. I don’t travel without them. He’ll sleep soundly.

  • M.a.r

    http://caselaw.findlaw.com/la-court-of-appeal/1573761.html

    Apparently Mr. Smith was annoyed with the parking meters outside his house at 516 St. Philip too…

  • Mark Thiel

       As a former resident of NO (60’s and 70’s) and a frequent visitor  I am dismayed at the attempts to reconstruct the ambiance. One thing that has NOT changed is the fascist police force. I’ve been slapped around by the rollers and spent the requisite time in old parish prison, and last visit I was shot by camera late through a yellow light Sunday a.m., for which I was mailed months later a fine for $135. Which I refuse to pay. Thus I dasn’t visit my fair city no more. Leave it for the casinos and upper echelon turistas.

  • Trixie

    While I agree that some bars play music way too loud I find it ridiculous to try to regulate what is ultimately art & culture. I sincerely understand that Dr. Kenny & Mr. Smith may have the sounds of live music coming into their homes at late hours; but compared to the other problems in the world such as poverty, violence, and crime, this particular crusade seems rather silly. I hope the issue is able to be resolved so we can better spend our time enjoying the music rather than fighting about it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/lord.david.58 Lord David

    Ms Ramsey, this is a great question, and one I know something about (you’re familiar with this case, too); When Cafe Istanbul wanted to open a “late night Jazz Club” in a residential neighborhood, many of us balked. Not at the music, but at the sudden change in atmosphere during late hours.
     We invited our other neighbors and our City Council person (Palmer) into the discussion. Let it suffice to say that NOBODY got exactly what they wanted. On the other hand EVERYBODY got a solution they could live with.
     Music Clubs of this size & nature were NOT a pre-existing condition here, but at the same time, we value the very nature of New Orleans, and many of us are artists of musicians, ourselves. Through cooperation, discussion concession and ongoing communication, an agreement was reached, and the situation grows, organically, as it should.
     Standing against music in the City Of New Orleans should be the crime here. These draconian measures of Frenchman Street would never have allowed Louis Armstrong the chance to play the music of our city.
    Nobody flies into ‘Be Quiet’ airport.
    There is no ‘Keep It Down’ park.
    August doesn’t celebrate ‘Shhhhh Fest’.

     While the current Mayor claims to be our ‘cultural ambassador’ his over reaching behind the scenes, like the ‘Hospitality District’ and ‘Cultural District Overlays’ are mere tax measures, but allow unheralded control measures where there should be none. Creativity doesn’t grow in a political petrie dish.

    Further, his attempts to ‘increase tourism’ by 2 million warn bodies a year is at sharp angles to these measures. What KIND of tourists? The ones that throw beads out their windows, in the Marigny, in July, screaming “Show me your tits!” at passing women? The kind that tea bag sleepy drunks on Bourbon Street?
    Finally, the NOPD, as demonstrated in the above comments, has set a war against artists and musicians, beginning with the ridiculous Costume Raid on Frenchman 18 months ago, and the ensuing ‘Permit Wars’ where locals are tased and maced for simply being there.
     A loud and unified voice must be raised, making it quite clear that this is NOT the will of the people of New Orleans, nor is it a direction that will be tolerated.

  • http://www.facebook.com/milliemchugh Millie Smedley McHugh

     “If you can’t stand the noise in the Quarter or on Frenchmen Street, then you need to live elsewhere and quit your bitching” — As you said.  I also “vote for the music, every time, hands-down, and so should you”

  • http://www.facebook.com/milliemchugh Millie Smedley McHugh

    “If you can’t stand the noise in the Quarter or on Frenchmen Street, then you need to live elsewhere and quit your bitching” — As you said.  I also “vote for the music, every time, hands-down, and so should you”.   I cannot understand what would possess a person to move inot the Quarter and then complain about noise — haven’t they ever visited it before they moved there?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UD6CR3ETAEZKLW5L6QVBC74QTE Duard

    Those of us of some age and blessed with long memory will recall a similar situation in the 1960s, when Jim Garrison (yeah, THAT Jim Garrison) instituted a cowboy-handed enforcement of noise ordinances and effective murdered the New Orleans music scene. Everyone from Mac Rebennack to Jesse Hill to Earl Palmer left for L.A. What had been a scene that basically formed and guided rock and soul music was dead. It’s strange that a place that is known for its music does its best to destroy it.

  • Ferg

    I’m a young musician, and I just played my first few gigs on Frenchmen this past year. They were some of the best gigs of my entire life. I want to continue playing there, and I want to continue to play loud. That is, I want to fucking rock out on Frenchmen. If you can’t handle the noise, get out of the neighborhood, crusty bastard. 

  • Mcar1455

    Well said! I am a frequent visitor to New Orleans from Chicago. Here, there are some areas known for live music and they are loud. They wouldn’t dream of shutting down businesses for a select few that say it’s NOISE. Alderman may be corrupt but, not STUPID! They know what tourists want. If New Orleans got rid of music on Frenchman Street and Bourbon Street, I would not be there as often! The food and architecture is a draw but, it’s all that combined with music that keeps drawing me to this fair city! Keep up the fight and don’t let those rich, pompous asses get rid of what make NOLA what it is!

  • Dave

    PLEASE NOLA – do not stop the music. I visit your fine city twice a year from Los Angeles. It is the anonymous nature of your environs, that casual moment you happen upon some street music, or stepping into a club to hear something new and exciting on Frenchmen or Bourbon streets that brings many of us back. It will be a huge mistake to silence the music, and my passion is heightened today as last night I got to hear the Neville’s and Trombone Shorty here in Los Angeles.

  • kibbles

    thank you for the thoughtful, honest response RT.

    before the FQ became a party zone for america, it was home to 40,000 full-time residents. it was a real neighborhood. they are gone now…theres <4,000 left per the last census. most of the family homes have been chiseled down into small, extremely expensive condos for the wealthy. they dont live here, they dont vote. they usually rent their “homes” to more tourists. 

    it’s a shame. but the damage is done and cannot be undone… not in the FQ, anyway. but now the party zone is expanding — it wants to grow into the next neighborhood over, Marigny. some people think this is great. others, usual residents who have jobs and need to sleep at night, arent so sure its great. they see what happened to the FQ and worry that it may happen to them as well. they like their residential neighborhood and dont want to be forced into the suburbs because they hate suburbs almost as much as not being able to sleep at night.

    whats a reasonable person to do? why, balance the needs of real residents w/ that of the bar owner and the drunken tourist, of course.

    compromise is reasonable. closing your doors is reasonable.

  • Anna Biet

    welcome to the horrors of gentrification…this is exactly how it went down in the E. Village in nyc…it was all about short sighted real estate developers…our neighborhood was swarmed with developers who pressured politicians who commanded the police…entire neighborhood pushed out and mall-ified under the guise of beautification…twenty years later where there were once jumping free music venues and mom and pop coffee shops there are now 7 elevens and starbucks…NEW ORLEANS DO NOT LET THIS HAPPEN TO YOU!! this is the last frontier

  • jedsdead

    Not just Frenchmen but Siberia on St. Claude and The Circle Bar too.  

  • Stephen Heterônimo

    American policing and anal retentiveness is getting way out of control, so much so, that it is making America one of the most boring and lame places to live on earth. In Brazil, where there is carnival all over the country, and in general, much more tolerance for noise, I don’t see people going to the lengths that Americans (US) go to just to accommodate a few ignoramus-assholes who can’t see the repercussions that their actions could have regarding the extraordinarily rich musical and social culture of New Orleans. The US is boring as it is, with bars closing at early hours of the night in many major cities. Leave New Orleans and it’s wonderful music culture alone! Frenchmen street has no rules, if you don’t won’t noise, there are plenty of other places for those people to be and live. If they can’t deal with that, what the fuck are they doing in the neighborhood? 

  • anom

    perfectly said. it amazes me that these geezers CHOOSE to live in the FQ and tourist-ridden areas. go be a stuck up asshole where you belong- uptown blue blood areas or perhaps one of sean cumming’s bullshit developments…

  • http://www.facebook.com/clay.s.conrad Clay S. Conrad

    Ah, the notorious SSmith… could this be the Stuart Smith, “who has been attempting to shut down music in the Quarter since he bought a residence there on St. Philip Street?”  Sounds like a pretty tainted messenger — especially since most of those “restaurants” have ALWAYS been nightclubs. 

    I just want to make sure that when I come visit New Orleans, that bullies and poltroons like Stuart Smith and Dr. Ken Doll don’t get a cent of my money…

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=42810345 Katherine Garner Welch

    Sorry to hear that as Frenchman Street is my favorite place for live music. That sounds like a typical NOPD officer. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/clay.s.conrad Clay S. Conrad

    Of course, a nice, peaceful picket at his medical office would be a good idea… signs saying “Dr. Kenny Wants to Put Musicians Out Of Work,” “Dr. Kenny to Tourists: Stay Home”, etc…

  • citizensofthecountryside

    The worlds smallest violin is playing for you and Dr. Kent.  So that you can quietly here the music.  Honestly, you know this is absurd.  However, you will stop at nothing to get what you want.  Right?

  • citizensofthecountryside

     *hear

  • Jim McNary

    Frenchmen is the reason I moved to the Marigny. If this geezer wants it to die, then may he die first.

  • Shannonjcravens

    I am sure it’s much quieter in Kenner, or across the lake!

  • alicencyberland

    i think this is a great idea, and if i still lived near that area i’d come picket for sure.

  • NOLACoast

    I think we can all agree that New Orleans has a history and culture unlike anywhere else, and music plays a huge part in shaping that history and culture.  While it’s true that some clubs do take things a bit too far when it comes to noise, the majority of them remain within the boundaries of acceptable sound levels.

    I live on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, but I work (and play) in New Orleans quite often, and the city has always felt like a second home to me.  With few exceptions, the people I’ve met in New Orleans over the years have been warm, friendly and inviting.  They’ve always presented me with an easygoing, non-judgmental, “come as you are” attitude that I’ve found quite refreshing.  If the situation presented itself for me to work AND live in New Orleans full-time, I would do it in a heartbeat.

    Clearly, New Orleans has changed quite a bit since the storm.  Some of these changes have made the city better.  However, some of the changes have made the city a bit more ordinary, bland and generic.  New Orleanians don’t strike me as the kind of people who are big fans of “generic”.  Despite it’s faults, they are proud of their city, and they have every right to be.

    Change is inevitable, but that doesn’t mean you have no say in it.  I would strongly encourage every resident of the city to pay closer attention to the political and business moves being made.  If there is something you don’t agree with, MAKE YOUR OPINION KNOWN.  Despite what some of New Orleans’ political figures seem to think, they still work for YOU, not the other way around.

    If, like me, you don’t live in New Orleans but you have a passion for the city, you can do something, too.  I signed this petition (http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/keep-french-quarter-and-frenchmen-music-alive.html), and I would encourage you to do so as well.  The powers that be need to be reminded that rebuilding New Orleans should not come at the expense of the city’s soul.

    “The death of democracy is not likely to be an
    assassination from ambush.  It will be a slow extinction from apathy,
    indifference, and undernourishment.” -Robert M. Hutchins

  • MARDIGRS2368

    You know what? go “F” yourself! I am SO SICK OF YOU AHOLES WHO MOVE TO MY CITY!!!! MY CITY!!1 MY FAMILY HAS BEEN HERE SINCE THE 1800’S! THE FRENCH QUARTER HAS BEEN THIS WAY SINCE THE 1800’S! IDIOT! IF YOU DIDN’T WANT TO HEAR MUSIC WHY THE FUCK DID YOU MOVE RIGHT BY THE QUARTERS! FUCK YOU AND YOUR OLD BITCH OF A WIFE! GET THE FUCK OUT!

  • J Lagarde

    Your homes are among the most valuable in the city.  It is not as if you are limited to where you can move to.  Many people have financial restrictions that force them to stay put, and they have some real problems but no one really cares.  You are able to purchase a mansion in any part of the city (or any other city) so it is hard to feel sorry for you with your problems unique to the ultra-wealthy.  You want to have some of the most enviable addresses in the city?  Well other people may  want to visit your neighborhood while they are in “the city that care forgot” (it’s been called that for longer than you owned your house I assume?)  You can’t have it both ways, and I find it hard to believe that people with such little foresight can even afford your houses.  Did you not see this noise issue coming?  Apparently one does not have to insightful before one can become incredibly wealthy.  I tend to feel more pity for the people who stay up at night because they are worried about next month’s food budget rather than the doctors and lawyers with nothing else to do but complain.  If you really worked as hard as you say, you would probably be tired enough to sleep at night.     

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=9123845 Joshua R. Murray

    I hope NOLA realizes that Frenchmen St is quite possibly the PRIMARY reason I visit the city. I believe if they come down hard and knock this street out of its famed history of music and culture, I will not return to the city in protest. I love the people who live there. I love the culture and the passion found throughout, but to step on a cultural icon like Frenchmen in the name of noise is saddening and I won’t stand for it.

  • Sarajacobelli

    Move to a gated suburban community in Kenner or English Turn, and leave Frenchmen St. alone.

  • former resident

    I used to live on the corner of Frenchmen & Chartres. I didn’t like the noise, so when my lease was up I moved.

    Honestly–I can deal with the noise from musicians. The thing that bothered me the most was the general disrespect of a lot of people that visited the street, i.e.-pissing in my driveway; using my front porch as a place to sit and eat your pizza/drink your beer, then leaving the trash there when you left; breaking up with your boyfriend at 4 AM outside of my bedroom window. 

    Once again, I know most of that comes with the territory, but people that visit those establishments should respect the property of the people that choose to call that street home. 

  • Anonymous

    If the music go away,the only thing we will have left is the food…oh let me guess,i guess they would try and take that away to saying the food is too good are the food is to spciy…a damn shame.

  • Sawami

    I literally signed up just to post on this article…  I think that we can all agree that New Orleans is a service industry town.  For there to be complaints about noise, especially on frenchman street, is frankly rediculous.  All you local squares, good luck with your economy without music.  Otherwise, you might as well be in detroit.  As a new orleanian, I know what to expect to live on the trendy outskirts of the city.  If you are concerned about your family’s well-being, I’m sorry, you will find the same shenanigans in any little city in the USA… And next time, think about the fact that more bands will play even louder because of your shit talk.  Louder bands.  I’m talkin USAD kinda shit.  In your back yard.

  • Cover your Ears DR.

     BLAH! BLAH! BLAH!  Folks don’t travel to New Orleans to visit the Bourgeoisie when they are in the French Quarter.  Visitors might gawk at the
    beautiful homes Uptown and that’s great for the city but, for folks who
    have a less pedestrian taste in culture, they seek it in other places
    in the French Quarter than Bourbon Street. It would be a damned shame if
    this soul-less minority should win out against cultural assets.

  • brusby

    Musicians all across the city should organize a boycott for a few days.  It’ll get the attention of politicians once everyone (including tourists and club owners) starts complaining and the city comes to a cultural standstill.

  • Bevcratch

    Bet NOLA music was there before the jerks who are suing.

  • BigSwede

    Absolutely. A one year musicians boycott on Jazz Fest would do it. It would certainly get their attention.

  • LawDawg27

     From the cop’s behavior I’d say it sounds like he was already paid to shut the place down before you ever dropped a beat.  NOPD is just as bad as it has always been. 

  • Upeople41

    Back in the early 1980s, a judge laughed a similar attempt out of court. The owner of a Mid-City / City Park property that had a well-known bar among its residents tried to have the music shut off at midnight. It had been a neighborhood bar that flourished, bringing larger crowds that often stood outside while others danced and enjoyed the good music inside. I hope the defendants find the results of that case to use on their behalf. The money of the few should not outweigh the millions spent by locals and tourists at New Orleans music hotspots.

  • Jchris0123

    If u dont  like  mice  dont  buy a house in Disneyland

  • Eskimopie

    There are plenty of black musicians playing all over the city.  And plenty of black-owned clubs in Treme.  A lot of them are juke joints, but I stumbled across a weekly neighborhood jam one night that was amazing.  Had I not been walking past I would have had no idea it existed.  Honestly, it’s mostly a music school student scene on Frenchman, probably because the bars don’t typically pay the bands and the players are still getting their chops.  

    Possibly because the cover bands are so loud, but Bourbon gets overlooked sometimes.  There are lots of really good black musicians.  Check out the Funky 544’s One Night Stand Band, Sing-Sing and My Bar have some great bands, Irving Mayfield’s always bringing in jazz musicians at his Playhouse… Krazy Korner has Dwayne Dopsie, Funky Pirate has Big Al, Chris Owens has Rooster and the Chicken Hawks.  

  • Dawn

    I couldn’t agree more. The Tourists and locals alike love Frenchmen Street. I am a tour guide, I have had people that were not so thrilled with Bourbon Streets because of the Strip Clubs and the “Younger Wilder Crowd” but loved Frenchmen Street, loud music and all. If you don’t like the loud music, don’t go there, if you live there, get used to it, be glad people are coming there to bring revenues to the city or move out!

  • musicadvocate

    Seriously….., and who would be hurt by that?

  • LostNolaGirl

    I would, because next year will be my first Jazz Fest since 2005

  • musiclover

    Don’t see the problem…. I assume these anti-noise group people are people who have moved into the neighborhood already knowing that it would be “noisy” and now want to try to make it quite. Maybe all the renters in the are should start adding terms in the lease stating that if they sign they can’t complain about the noise, I mean what do you expect for moving in an are where there is gonna be constant noise going on. Thats like someone in Chicago or New York moving into an apartment right next to an El Train and complaining to the city to stop the trains at night! Get your people together and petitions signed.

    And totally agree that if all/majority of the artists banned together and boycotted Jazz Fest for 1 yr these noise ordinances will literally go out the window! Remember people, if you wanna get heard you gotta be in numbers and/or hit their pockets! Boycotting just one fest(patrons/musicians/venues) will put you in the position of power!

    Let’s keep this music flowing!

  • bmcsteve

    I experienced my first Jazz Fest this year. We stayed on Frenchmen St, and I fell in love with New Orleans because of the music scene. So much so, that we have already booked a place to stay for two weeks during next years Jazz Fest. This alone is over $2000 that my wife and I are investing in your city, not to mention what we will spend on food, drink, entertainment, and shopping….. I would hazard a guess that we will spend close to $5000 while we are there. No music? No reason for me to go. Just saying…

  • http://www.facebook.com/susan.angoy Susan Angoy

    I’ve just returned from NOLA where I visited from London, UK. We stayed on Frenchmen between DBA and The Snug, and it was just amazing. I think NO City Council would seriously be shooting itself in the foot if they did anything to change the character of Frenchmen. It is totally unique and a huge draw for all lovers of music. My concern is not to do with the noise, but a fear that it could become ‘made-over’ like some kind of ‘Disney tourist experience’. I would always stay in that neighbourhood and could happily live there. Despite being in the middle of the music, we still slept when we weren’t in a club. So, please, New Orleans City, keep it as it is and support the wonderful musicians who play with soul, dedication and a true love of their craft. Susan from London