• Anonymous

    Thank you so much for this eloquent account of Kenny and his talent. I’ve been waiting and waiting for someone to publicly acknowledge what a loss his death is to the world of music, both in New Orleans and beyond. He was an original.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you so much for this eloquent account of Kenny and his talent. I’ve been waiting and waiting for someone to publicly acknowledge what a loss his death is to the world of music, both in New Orleans and beyond. He was an original.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you so much for this eloquent account of Kenny and his talent. I’ve been waiting and waiting for someone to publicly acknowledge what a loss his death is to the world of music, both in New Orleans and beyond. He was an original.

  • nolagorilla

    Nice work. Kenny wasn’t one to ring his own bell but somebody oughta make some noise about him now. He was one of the best.

  • nolagorilla

    Nice work. Kenny wasn’t one to ring his own bell but somebody oughta make some noise about him now. He was one of the best.

  • nolagorilla

    Nice work. Kenny wasn’t one to ring his own bell but somebody oughta make some noise about him now. He was one of the best.

  • Richard O’Donnell

     I saw him 20 years ago, busking in the French Quarter, over 3 days, and was so impressed with his playing – the best I had seen in the 2 weeks I spent in the US (Chicago, Memphis and New Orleans) with my eldest brother. I was only 20yrs old then and my brother was not impressed by some guy playing on the street – but he was unaware that this was not unusual for professional musicians to earn extra cash by busking during the day. Back home in the UK (I’m from Edinburgh, Scotland), almost ALL buskers are usually homeless and not talented. My brother couldn’t see past that stereotype. We also saw him play at night at a venue I think was Checkpoint Charlie’s, with the English pianist Carl Sonny Leyland – great gig.
    I knew he was something special – real special. I managed to learn one song off him – “Come On In This House”.
    I asked his name multiple times but never could understand his accent. Thus, it was only more recently, with the advent of the internet, did I find out his name. I have one photo of him and good memories of him playing his metal-bodied shiny Dobro. Probably the best slide guitarist I have ever seen play live.
    I indeed feel influenced musically by his talent.
    RIP Kenny Holladay

    Richard O’Donnell
    Edinburgh, Scotland

  • Richard O’Donnell

     I saw him 20 years ago, busking in the French Quarter, over 3 days, and was so impressed with his playing – the best I had seen in the 2 weeks I spent in the US (Chicago, Memphis and New Orleans) with my eldest brother. I was only 20yrs old then and my brother was not impressed by some guy playing on the street – but he was unaware that this was not unusual for professional musicians to earn extra cash by busking during the day. Back home in the UK (I’m from Edinburgh, Scotland), almost ALL buskers are usually homeless and not talented. My brother couldn’t see past that stereotype. We also saw him play at night at a venue I think was Checkpoint Charlie’s, with the English pianist Carl Sonny Leyland – great gig.
    I knew he was something special – real special. I managed to learn one song off him – “Come On In This House”.
    I asked his name multiple times but never could understand his accent. Thus, it was only more recently, with the advent of the internet, did I find out his name. I have one photo of him and good memories of him playing his metal-bodied shiny Dobro. Probably the best slide guitarist I have ever seen play live.
    I indeed feel influenced musically by his talent.
    RIP Kenny Holladay

    Richard O’Donnell
    Edinburgh, Scotland

  • Richard O’Donnell

     I saw him 20 years ago, busking in the French Quarter, over 3 days, and was so impressed with his playing – the best I had seen in the 2 weeks I spent in the US (Chicago, Memphis and New Orleans) with my eldest brother. I was only 20yrs old then and my brother was not impressed by some guy playing on the street – but he was unaware that this was not unusual for professional musicians to earn extra cash by busking during the day. Back home in the UK (I’m from Edinburgh, Scotland), almost ALL buskers are usually homeless and not talented. My brother couldn’t see past that stereotype. We also saw him play at night at a venue I think was Checkpoint Charlie’s, with the English pianist Carl Sonny Leyland – great gig.
    I knew he was something special – real special. I managed to learn one song off him – “Come On In This House”.
    I asked his name multiple times but never could understand his accent. Thus, it was only more recently, with the advent of the internet, did I find out his name. I have one photo of him and good memories of him playing his metal-bodied shiny Dobro. Probably the best slide guitarist I have ever seen play live.
    I indeed feel influenced musically by his talent.
    RIP Kenny Holladay

    Richard O’Donnell
    Edinburgh, Scotland

  • Steve from Sandy’s Music

    Ah, damn.

    Kenny’s dobro was a gift to him from everybody at Sandy’s Music in Cambridge, after his National got stolen. I was managing the store and came up with the idea of passing the hat. Kenny knew nothing about it until it was a done deal.

    The Screamin’ Coyotes were a truly fun band and the Plough was always packed when they played, as was the long-gone and sadly missed 1369. Kenny made hand-drawn posters for the band with hilarious fake newspaper headlines–

    “Screamin’ Coyotes, Messengers from Atlantis!”

    “Man, 42, Can’t Spel.”

    A lot of people try to play this stuff. Kenny was the real deal. Candace, if you’re reading this, deepest condolences from Steve, Lisa and the rest of the old Sandy’s crew. 

  • Cambridge is not the same without you man. I bet NO isn’t either. Miss You!

  • disqus_5T2jXBEN10

    I knew Kenny from Harvard Sq from the early 80a and bumped into him in NO in the early 90s playing in a corner blues bar. A great story about Kenny was John Fogerty was placing a tombstone at the reported grave of Robert Johnson to coincide with a release of a double set of his recordings from the 30s and the guy who was supposed to play couldnt becaue he had a previous engagement at his church. Somehow Kenny got called in to play the memorial for the tombstone of Robert Johnson!!! I guarantee you RJ would have been honoured. My only regret about knowing Kenny is that I didnt get to spend more time haering him play. Sweet dreams brother Play on!!